Fourth Quarter Home Prices Up 5.3 Percent; Nearly Two-Thirds of Markets at All-Time High

Washington, D.C. – February 13, 2018 (nar.realtor) An uptick in existing-home sales in the final three months of 2017 pulled down housing inventory to an all-time low and kept home-price growth at its recent robust pace, according to the latest quarterly report by the National Association of REALTORS®.

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The national median existing single-family home price in the fourth quarter was $247,800, which is up 5.3 percent from the fourth quarter of 2016 ($235,400). The median price during last year’s third quarter climbed 5.6 percent from the third quarter of 2016.

Single-family home prices last quarter increased in 92 percent of measured markets, with 162 out of 177 metropolitan statistical areas(1) (MSAs) showing sales price gains in the fourth quarter compared to a year ago. Twenty-six metro areas (15 percent) experienced double-digit increases (11 percent in the third quarter), and 18 metros eclipsed their previous peak sales price. Overall, home prices are now at their all-time high in 114 markets (64 percent).

Lawrence Yun

Lawrence Yun

Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, says 2017 capped off another year where home prices in most markets ascended at a steady clip amidst improving sales and worsening inventory conditions. “A majority of the country saw an upswing in buyer interest at the end of last year, which ultimately ended up putting even more strain on inventory levels and prices,” he said. “Remarkably, home prices have risen a cumulative 48 percent since 2011, yet during this same timeframe, incomes are up only 15 percent. In the West region, where very healthy labor markets are driving demand, the gap is even wider.”

Added Yun, “These consistent, multi-year price gains have certainly been great news for homeowners, and especially for those who were at one time in a negative equity situation; however, the shortage of new homes being built over the past decade is really burdening local markets and making homebuying less affordable.”

Total existing-home sales(2), including single family and condos, increased 4.3 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.62 million in the fourth quarter from 5.39 million in the third quarter, and are 1.3 percent higher than the 5.55 million pace during the fourth quarter of 2016.

At the end of the fourth quarter, there were 1.48 million existing homes available for sale(3), which was 10.3 percent below the 1.65 million homes for sale at the end of the fourth quarter in 2016. The average supply during the fourth quarter was 3.5 months – down from 4.2 months in the fourth quarter of last year.

The national family median income rose to $74,492(4) in the fourth quarter, but overall affordability still edged downward compared to a year ago because of the combination of rising mortgage rates and home prices. To purchase a single-family home at the national median price, a buyer making a 5 percent down payment would need an income of $55,585, a 10 percent down payment would require an income of $52,659, and $46,808 would be needed for a 20 percent down payment.

“While tight supply is expected to keep home prices on an upward trajectory in most metro areas in 2018, both the uptick in mortgage rates and the impact of the new tax law on some high-cost markets could cause price growth to moderate nationally,” said Yun. “In areas where homebuilding has severely lagged job creation in recent years, it’s going to be a slow slog before there’s enough new construction to cool price appreciation to a pace that aligns more closely with incomes.”

The five most expensive housing markets in the fourth quarter were the San Jose, California metro area, where the median existing single-family price was $1,270,000; San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, California, $920,000; Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine, California, $785,000; urban Honolulu, $760,600; and San Diego-Carlsbad, $610,000.

The five lowest-cost metro areas in the fourth quarter were Cumberland, Maryland, $84,600; Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio, $90,200; Decatur, Illinois, $100,000; Binghamton, New York, $108,900; and Wichita Falls, Texas, $110,400.

Metro area condominium and cooperative prices – covering changes in 61 metro areas – showed the national median existing-condo price was $237,500 in the fourth quarter, up 7.0 percent from the fourth quarter of 2016 ($222,000). Eighty-four percent of metro areas showed gains in their median condo price from a year ago.

Regional Breakdown
Total existing-home sales in the Northeast jumped 10.1 percent in the fourth quarter but are 0.4 percent below the fourth quarter of 2016. The median existing single-family home price in the Northeast was $268,100 in the fourth quarter, up 4.2 percent from a year ago.

In the Midwest, existing-home sales rose 6.0 percent in the fourth quarter and are 2.3 percent above a year ago. The median existing single-family home price in the Midwest grew 7.2 percent to $193,800 in the fourth quarter from the same quarter a year ago.

Existing-home sales in the South increased 3.8 percent in the fourth quarter and are 1.8 percent higher than the fourth quarter of 2016. The median existing single-family home price in the South was $221,600 in the fourth quarter, 5.0 percent above a year earlier.

In the West, existing-home sales in the fourth quarter were at an annualized rate of 1.23 million (unchanged from the third quarter), up 0.3 percent from a year ago. The median existing single-family home price in the West increased 7.2 percent to $374,400 in the fourth quarter from the fourth quarter of 2016.

The National Association of REALTORS®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

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NOTE: NAR releases quarterly median single-family price data for approximately 175 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs). In some cases the MSA prices may not coincide with data released by state and local REALTORS® associations. Any discrepancy may be due to differences in geographic coverage, product mix, and timing. In the event of discrepancies, REALTORS® are advised that for business purposes, local data from their association may be more relevant.

Data tables for MSA home prices (single family and condo) are posted at https://www.nar.realtor/research-and-statistics/housing-statistics/metropolitan-median-area-prices-and-affordability. If insufficient data is reported for a MSA in particular quarter, it is listed as N/A. For areas not covered in the tables, please contact the local association of REALTORS®.

1. Areas are generally metropolitan statistical areas as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. NAR adheres to the OMB definitions, although in some areas an exact match is not possible from the available data. A list of counties included in MSA definitions is available at: http://www.census.gov/population/estimates/metro-city/List4.txt (link is external).

Regional median home prices are from a separate sampling that includes rural areas and portions of some smaller metros that are not included in this report; the regional percentage changes do not necessarily parallel changes in the larger metro areas. The only valid comparisons for median prices are with the same period a year earlier due to seasonality in buying patterns. Quarter-to-quarter comparisons do not compensate for seasonal changes, especially for the timing of family buying patterns.

Median price measurement reflects the types of homes that are selling during the quarter and can be skewed at times by changes in the sales mix. For example, changes in the level of distressed sales, which are heavily discounted, can vary notably in given markets and may affect percentage comparisons. Annual price measures generally smooth out any quarterly swings.

NAR began tracking of metropolitan area median single-family home prices in 1979; the metro area condo price series dates back to 1989.

Because there is a concentration of condos in high-cost metro areas, the national median condo price often is higher than the median single-family price. In a given market area, condos typically cost less than single-family homes. As the reporting sample expands in the future, additional areas will be included in the condo price report.

2. The seasonally adjusted annual rate for a particular quarter represents what the total number of actual sales for a year would be if the relative sales pace for that quarter was maintained for four consecutive quarters. Total home sales include single family, townhomes, condominiums and co-operative housing.

3. Total inventory and month’s supply data are available back through 1999, while single-family inventory and month’s supply are available back to 1982 (prior to 1999, single-family sales accounted for more than 90 percent of transactions and condos were measured only on a quarterly basis).

Seasonally adjusted rates are used in reporting quarterly data to factor out seasonal variations in resale activity. For example, sales volume normally is higher in the summer and relatively light in winter, primarily because of differences in the weather and household buying patterns.

4. Income figures are rounded to the nearest hundred, based on NAR modeling of Census data. Qualifying income requirements are determined using several scenarios on downpayment percentages and assume 25 percent of gross income devoted to mortgage principal and interest at a mortgage interest rate of 3.9%.

NOTE: Existing-Home Sales for January will be released February 21, and the Pending Home Sales Index for January will be released February 28; release times are 10:00 a.m. ET.

Media Contact:

Adam DeSanctis
(202) 383-1178
Email

Early-Stage Mortgage Delinquencies Dip Again in November as Hurricanes’ Impact Wanes

  • Overall Mortgage Delinquency Rate Fell 0.1 Percentage Points Year Over Year
  • Foreclosure Rate Declined 0.2 Percentage Points Year Over Year
  • Transition Rates for 60-Day and 90-Day Delinquency Rose Sharply in Texas and Florida Likely Due to 2017 Hurricanes

IRVINE, CA – February 13, 2018 (BUSINESS WIRE) CoreLogic® (NYSE: CLGX), a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report which shows that, nationally, 5.1 percent of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due including those in foreclosure) in November 2017. This represents a 0.1 percentage point year-over-year decline in the overall delinquency rate compared with November 2016 when it was 5.2 percent.

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As of November 2017, the foreclosure inventory rate, which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process, was 0.6 percent, down 0.2 percentage points from 0.8 percent in November 2016. The foreclosure inventory rate has held steady at 0.6 percent since August 2017, the lowest level since June 2007 when it was also at 0.6 percent. This past November’s foreclosure inventory rate was the lowest for the month of November in 11 years, since it was also 0.6 percent in November 2006.

Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next.

The rate for early-stage delinquencies, defined as 30-59 days past due, was 2.2 percent in November 2017, down 0.1 percentage points from 2.3 percent in October 2017 and unchanged from 2.2 percent in November 2016. The share of mortgages that were 60-89 days past due in November 2017 was 0.9 percent, unchanged from October 2017 and up from 0.7 percent in November 2016. The serious delinquency rate, reflecting loans 90 days or more past due, was 2.0 percent in November 2017, up from 1.9 percent in October 2017 and down from 2.3 percent in November 2016. Prior to November 2017, the serious delinquency rate had held steady for five consecutive months at 1.9 percent—the lowest level for any month since October 2007 when it was also 1.9 percent.

“The effects of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria appear clearly in our mortgage delinquency report,” said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. “Serious delinquency rates are up sharply in Texas and Florida compared with a year ago, while lower in all other states except Alaska. In Puerto Rico, the serious delinquency rate jumped to 6.3 percent in November, up 2.7 percentage points compared with a year before. In the Miami metropolitan area, serious delinquency was up more than one-third from one year earlier to 5.1 percent, and it more than doubled to 4.6 percent in the Houston area.”

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Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 1 percent in November 2017, down from 1.1 percent in October 2017 and unchanged from 1 percent in November 2016. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current-to-30-day transition rate was 1.2 percent and it peaked in November 2008 at 2 percent.

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“Transition rates for 60-day and 90-day delinquency, while stable across most of the country, were up sharply in many areas impacted by the 2017 hurricanes,” said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. “In many of the harder-hit regions, such as the Houston and Miami metropolitan areas, housing stock availability has taken a hit as many homes were damaged and are no longer habitable. As a result, we expect to see further upward pressure on prices and rents for habitable homes, which will continue to erode affordability.”

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For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: www.corelogic.com/blog.

Methodology

The data in this report represents foreclosure and delinquency activity reported through November 2017.

The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The delinquency, transition and foreclosure rates are measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Homes without mortgage liens are not typically subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data.

Source: CoreLogic

The data provided is for use only by the primary recipient or the primary recipient’s publication or broadcast. This data may not be re-sold, republished or licensed to any other source, including publications and sources owned by the primary recipient’s parent company without prior written permission from CoreLogic. Any CoreLogic data used for publication or broadcast, in whole or in part, must be sourced as coming from CoreLogic, a data and analytics company. For use with broadcast or web content, the citation must directly accompany first reference of the data. If the data is illustrated with maps, charts, graphs or other visual elements, the CoreLogic logo must be included on screen or website. For questions, analysis or interpretation of the data, contact Lori Guyton at lguyton@cvic.com or Bill Campbell at bill@campbelllewis.com. Data provided may not be modified without the prior written permission of CoreLogic. Do not use the data in any unlawful manner. This data is compiled from public records, contributory databases and proprietary analytics, and its accuracy is dependent upon these sources.

About CoreLogic

CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company’s combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.

CORELOGIC and the CoreLogic logo are trademarks of CoreLogic, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries.

Contacts

For CoreLogic
For real estate industry and trade media:
Bill Campbell
(212) 995-8057
bill@campbelllewis.com

or

For general news media:
Lori Guyton
(901)277-6066
lguyton@cvic.com

Ellie Mae Reports Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2017 Results

Pleasanton, CA – February 08, 2018 (BUSINESS WIRE) Ellie Mae® (NYSE:ELLI), the leading cloud-based platform provider for the mortgage finance industry, today reported results for the fourth quarter and full year ended December 31, 2017.

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Fourth Quarter 2017 Highlights

  • Revenues of $112.9 million, up 17% from $96.2 million in 2016
  • Net income of $9.9 million(1), down from $10.9 million in 2016
  • Adjusted EBITDA of $28.5 million, down from $29.4 million in 2016
  • 11,000 Encompass seats booked

Full Year 2017 Highlights

  • Revenues of $417.0 million, up 16% from $360.3 million in 2016
  • Net income of $52.9 million(1), up from $37.8 million in 2016
  • Adjusted EBITDA of $122.6 million, up from $113.1 million in 2016
  • 40,800 Encompass seats booked

“It was a great finish to the year as we continued to gain market share and extend Encompass further into the enterprise segment,” said Jonathan Corr, president and CEO of Ellie Mae. “Our fourth quarter financial results exceeded expectations while seat bookings of 11,000 were also better than expected as more lenders are recognizing the power of the Encompass NG Lending Platform to increase productivity and efficiency.”

“During the year we made significant progress extending our leadership position. We introduced new products, including our Encompass Connect Suite of solutions, which leverage our new open and scalable architecture, completed the acquisition of Velocify which accelerates our delivery of the front end digital experience, and continued the development and rollout of our next generation lending platform. We see tremendous long-term growth opportunities as we drive toward our goal of end-to-end automation of the mortgage process,” concluded Mr. Corr.

Financial Results

Total revenue for the fourth quarter of 2017 was $112.9 million, compared to $96.2 million for the fourth quarter of 2016. Net income for the fourth quarter of 2017 was $9.9 million(1), or $0.28 per diluted share, compared to $10.9 million, or $0.31 per diluted share, for the fourth quarter of 2016. Fourth quarter 2017 net income(1) reflects the impact of changes to the GAAP tax treatment of stock compensation benefits(1) and a benefit resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.

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1. Please see paragraph titled, “Note Regarding Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting Standard.”

On a non-GAAP basis, adjusted net income for the fourth quarter of 2017 was $11.8 million, or $0.33 per diluted share, compared to $16.2 million, or $0.46 per diluted share, for the fourth quarter of 2016. Adjusted EBITDA for the fourth quarter of 2017 was $28.5 million, compared to $29.4 million for the fourth quarter of 2016. GAAP and non-GAAP per share results for the quarters ended December 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016 include the effect of an additional 3.2 million shares of Common Stock from our follow-on equity offering in August 2016.

Total revenue for 2017 was $417.0 million, compared to $360.3 million for 2016. Net income for 2017 was $52.9 million1, or $1.48 per diluted share, compared to $37.8 million, or $1.15 per diluted share, for 2016. Full year 2017 net income1 reflects the impact of changes to the GAAP tax treatment of stock compensation benefits1 and a benefit resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.

On a non-GAAP basis, adjusted net income for 2017 was $58.9 million, or $1.64 per diluted share, compared to $60.6 million, or $1.85 per diluted share, for 2016. Adjusted EBITDA for 2017 was $122.6 million, compared to $113.1 million for 2016. GAAP and non-GAAP per share results for the years ended December 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016 include the effect of an additional 3.2 million shares of Common Stock and 1.3 million weighted average shares of Common Stock, respectively, from our follow-on equity offering in August 2016.

First Quarter and Full Year 2018 Financial Outlook

Our guidance is provided utilizing ASC 605. We are in the process of finalizing our guidance under ASC 606, and we will present an updated guide under both ASC 606 and ASC 605 when we report results for the first quarter of 2018. We will adopt ASC 606 using the modified retrospective method. The adoption of ASC 606 could have an effect on the timing of both revenue recognition and the recognition of costs to obtain contracts including commissions.

For the first quarter of 2018, our revenue is expected to be in the range of $107.0 million to $109.0 million. Net loss is expected to be in the range of $(9.0) million to $(8.0) million, or $(0.26) to $(0.23) per basic share, which reflects additional implementation costs related to the adoption of ASC 606 and the amortization of intangible assets and integration costs related to the Velocify acquisition. On a non-GAAP basis, adjusted net income is expected to be in the range of $2.4 million to $3.4 million, or $0.07 to $0.09 per diluted share, which reflects the non-GAAP tax adjustment. Adjusted EBITDA is expected to be in the range of $13.6 million to $15.6 million. Per share guidance assumes a weighted average share count of approximately 36 million.

For the full year 2018, revenue is expected to be in the range of $495.0 million to $505.0 million. Net income is expected to be in the range of $10.0 million to $14.0 million, or $0.28 to $0.38 per diluted share. On a non-GAAP basis, adjusted net income is expected to be in the range of $61.0 million to $65.0 million, or $1.68 to $1.78 per diluted share, which reflects the non-GAAP tax adjustment. Adjusted EBITDA is expected to be in the range of $126.7 million to $132.0 million. Per share guidance assumes a weighted average share count of approximately 37 million.

Additional information about the non-GAAP financial measures presented in this release, including a reconciliation of the non-GAAP financial measures to their related GAAP financial measures, is set forth below under the section entitled, “Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures.”

Quarterly Conference Call

Ellie Mae (the “Company”) will discuss its fourth quarter and full year 2017 results today, February 8, 2018, via teleconference at 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time. To access the call, please dial 877-723-9502 or 719-325-4835 at least five minutes prior to the 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time start time. A live webcast of the call will be available on the Investor Relations section of the Company’s website at http://investor.elliemae.com. An audio replay of the call will be available through February 22, 2018 by dialing 888-203-1112 or 719-457-0820 and entering access code 3311197.

Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures

Ellie Mae provides investors with the non-GAAP financial measures of adjusted net income, adjusted EBITDA, adjusted gross profit, and free cash flow in addition to the traditional GAAP operating performance measure of net income as part of its overall assessment of its performance. Adjusted net income consists of net income plus stock-based compensation expense, amortization of intangible assets, acquisition-related costs, and the non-GAAP income tax adjustments. EBITDA consists of net income plus depreciation and amortization, amortization of intangible assets, and income tax provision, less other income, net. Adjusted EBITDA consists of EBITDA plus stock-based compensation expense. Adjusted gross profit consists of gross profit plus stock-based compensation and amortization of intangible assets that are included in cost of revenues. Free cash flow consists of net cash provided by operating activities less acquisition of property and equipment and internal-use software. Ellie Mae uses adjusted net income, adjusted EBITDA, and adjusted gross profit as measures of operating performance because they enable period to period comparisons by excluding potential differences caused by variations in the age and depreciable lives of fixed assets, amortization of intangible assets, acquisition-related costs, and changes in interest expense and interest income that are influenced by capital market conditions. The Company also believes it is useful to exclude stock-based compensation expense from adjusted net income, adjusted EBITDA, and adjusted gross profit because the amount of non-cash expense associated with stock-based awards made at certain prices and points in time (a) do not necessarily reflect how the Company’s business is performing at any particular time and (b) can vary significantly between periods due to the timing of new stock-based awards. The non-GAAP income tax adjustments are calculated based on the annual non-GAAP effective tax rate, which quantifies the tax effects of the non-GAAP adjustments and reverses the one-time measurement of the tax impact from the enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, and the excess tax benefits from the adoption of ASU 2016-09 for GAAP purposes. These non-GAAP financial measures are not measurements of the Company’s financial performance under GAAP and have limitations as analytical tools. Accordingly, these non-GAAP financial measures should not be considered a substitute for, or superior to, net income, operating income, gross profit, operating cash flow or other financial measures calculated in accordance with GAAP. The Company cautions that other companies in Ellie Mae’s industry may calculate adjusted net income, EBITDA, adjusted EBITDA, adjusted gross profit, and free cash flow differently than the Company does, further limiting their usefulness as comparative measures. A reconciliation of net income to adjusted net income, EBITDA and adjusted EBITDA, gross profit to adjusted gross profit, and operating cash flow to free cash flow is included in the tables below.

Note Regarding Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting Standard

Ellie Mae adopted an accounting standard issued in 2016 whereby excess tax benefit generated upon the settlement or exercise of stock awards are no longer recognized as additional paid-in capital but are instead recognized as an income tax benefit. The adoption was effective January 1, 2017, and the Company recognized a benefit to GAAP net income of $15.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2017. This also had the accounting effect of increasing net cash provided by operating activities by $10.2 million and $4.8 million and a corresponding $10.2 million and $4.8 million decrease in net cash provided by financing activities for the full year and fourth quarter ended December 31, 2016, respectively.

Disclosure Information

Ellie Mae uses the investor relations section on its website as the means of complying with its disclosure obligations under Regulation FD. Accordingly, we recommend that investors should monitor Ellie Mae’s investor relations website in addition to following Ellie Mae’s press releases, SEC filings, and public conference calls and webcasts.

About Ellie Mae

Ellie Mae (NYSE:ELLI) is the leading cloud-based platform provider for the mortgage finance industry. Ellie Mae’s technology solutions enable lenders to originate more loans, lower origination costs, and reduce the time to close, all while ensuring the highest levels of compliance, quality and efficiency. Visit EllieMae.com or call (877) 355-4362 to learn more.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements under the safe harbor provisions under The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements include projected revenue, net income, adjusted EBITDA, and adjusted net income for the first quarter and fiscal year 2018, as well as statements regarding Ellie Mae’s ability to successfully integrate Velocify’s software solutions with Ellie Mae’s software solutions and the potential benefits of the combined software solutions. These statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors that may cause Ellie Mae’s results to be materially different than those expressed or implied in such statements. Such differences may be based on factors such as changes in the volume of residential mortgages in the United States; changes in other macroeconomic factors affecting the residential real estate industry; the impact of the Company’s implementation of Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 606 Revenue from Contracts with Customers on its results of operations, including its projected revenue, net income, adjusted EBITDA, and adjusted net income for the first quarter and fiscal year 2018; changes in strategic planning decisions by management; the Company’s ability to manage growth and expenses as it continues to scale its business; reallocation of internal resources; costs incurred and delays in developing new products; changes in anticipated rates of SaaS seat additions, and new customer acquisitions; the possibility that economic benefits of future opportunities may never materialize, including unexpected variations in market growth and demand for the acquired products and technologies; delays and disruptions, including changing relationships with partners, customers, employees or suppliers; the satisfactory performance, reliability and availability of the Company’s products and services; the amount of costs incurred in connection with supporting and integrating new customers and partners; ongoing personnel and logistical challenges of managing a larger organization; changes in other macroeconomic factors affecting the residential real estate industry, and other risk factors included in documents that Ellie Mae has filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), including but not limited to its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016, as updated from time to time by the Company’s quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and its other filings with the SEC. Other unknown or unpredictable factors also could have material adverse effects on Ellie Mae’s future results. The forward-looking statements included in this press release are made only as of the date hereof. Ellie Mae cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Accordingly, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Finally, Ellie Mae expressly disclaims any intent or obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances, unless otherwise required by law.

© 2018 Ellie Mae, Inc. Ellie Mae®, Encompass®, AllRegs®, the Ellie Mae logo and other trademarks or service marks of Ellie Mae, Inc. appearing herein are property of Ellie Mae, Inc. or its subsidiaries. All rights reserved. Other company and product names may be trademarks or copyrights of their respective owners.

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CoreLogic Reports December Home Prices Up More Than 6 Percent Year-Over-Year for Fifth Consecutive Month

  • Largest Price Gains During 2017 Were in California, Idaho, Nevada, Utah and Washington
  • Affordability Continues to Erode, Especially in Low-Price Range
  • Home Prices Projected to Increase by 4.3 Percent by December 2018

Irvine, CA – February 6th, 2018 (BUSINESS WIRE) CoreLogic® (NYSE: CLGX), a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its CoreLogic Home Price Index (HPI™) and HPI Forecast™ for December 2017, which shows home prices are up both year over year and month over month. Home prices nationally increased year over year by 6.6 percent from December 2016 to December 2017, and on a month-over-month basis home prices increased by 0.5 percent in December 2017 compared with November 2017,* according to the CoreLogic HPI.

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Looking ahead, the CoreLogic HPI Forecast indicates that home prices will increase by 4.3 percent on a year-over-year basis from December 2017 to December 2018, and on a month-over-month basis home prices are expected to decrease by 0.4 percent from December 2017 to January 2018. The CoreLogic HPI Forecast is a projection of home prices using the CoreLogic HPI and other economic variables. Values are derived from state-level forecasts by weighting indices according to the number of owner-occupied households for each state.

“The number of homes for sale has remained very low,” said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. “Job growth lowered the unemployment rate to 4.1 percent by year’s end, the lowest level in 17 years. Rising income and consumer confidence has increased the number of prospective homebuyers. The net result of rising demand and limited for-sale inventory is a continued appreciation in home prices.”

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According to CoreLogic Market Condition Indicators (MCI) data, an analysis of housing values in the country’s 100 largest metropolitan areas based on housing stock, 35 percent of metropolitan areas have an overvalued housing market as of December 2017. The MCI analysis categorizes home prices in individual markets as undervalued, at value or overvalued by comparing home prices to their long-run, sustainable levels, which are supported by local market fundamentals such as disposable income. Also, as of December, 28 percent of the top 100 metropolitan areas were undervalued and 37 percent were at value. When looking at only the top 50 markets based on housing stock, 48 percent were overvalued, 14 percent were undervalued and 38 percent were at value. The MCI analysis defines an overvalued housing market as one in which home prices are at least 10 percent higher than the long-term, sustainable level, while an undervalued housing market is one in which home prices are at least 10 percent below the sustainable level.

“Home prices continue to rise as a result of aggressive monetary policy, the economic and jobs recovery and a lack of housing stock. The largest price gains during 2017 were in five Western states: California, Idaho, Nevada, Utah and Washington,” said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. “As home prices and the cost of originating loans rise, affordability continues to erode, making it more challenging for both first time buyers and moderate-income families to buy. At this point, we estimate that more than one-third of the 100 largest metropolitan areas are overvalued.”

* November 2017 data was revised. Revisions with public records data are standard, and to ensure accuracy, CoreLogic incorporates the newly released public data to provide updated results.

Methodology
The CoreLogic HPI™ is built on industry-leading public record, servicing and securities real-estate databases and incorporates more than 40 years of repeat-sales transactions for analyzing home price trends. Generally released on the first Tuesday of each month with an average five-week lag, the CoreLogic HPI is designed to provide an early indication of home price trends by market segment and for the “Single-Family Combined” tier representing the most comprehensive set of properties, including all sales for single-family attached and single-family detached properties. The indexes are fully revised with each release and employ techniques to signal turning points sooner. The CoreLogic HPI provides measures for multiple market segments, referred to as tiers, based on property type, price, time between sales, loan type (conforming vs. non-conforming) and distressed sales. Broad national coverage is available from the national level down to ZIP Code, including non-disclosure states.

CoreLogic HPI Forecasts™ are based on a two-stage, error-correction econometric model that combines the equilibrium home price—as a function of real disposable income per capita—with short-run fluctuations caused by market momentum, mean-reversion, and exogenous economic shocks like changes in the unemployment rate. With a 30-year forecast horizon, CoreLogic HPI Forecasts project CoreLogic HPI levels for two tiers—“Single-Family Combined” (both attached and detached) and “Single-Family Combined Excluding Distressed Sales.” As a companion to the CoreLogic HPI Forecasts, Stress-Testing Scenarios align with Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR) national scenarios to project five years of home prices under baseline, adverse and severely adverse scenarios at state, Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA) and ZIP Code levels. The forecast accuracy represents a 95-percent statistical confidence interval with a +/- 2.0 percent margin of error for the index.

Source: CoreLogic
The data provided are for use only by the primary recipient or the primary recipient’s publication or broadcast. This data may not be resold, republished or licensed to any other source, including publications and sources owned by the primary recipient’s parent company without prior written permission from CoreLogic. Any CoreLogic data used for publication or broadcast, in whole or in part, must be sourced as coming from CoreLogic, a data and analytics company. For use with broadcast or web content, the citation must directly accompany first reference of the data. If the data are illustrated with maps, charts, graphs or other visual elements, the CoreLogic logo must be included on screen or website. For questions, analysis or interpretation of the data, contact Lori Guyton at lguyton@cvic.com or Bill Campbell at bill@campbelllewis.com. Data provided may not be modified without the prior written permission of CoreLogic. Do not use the data in any unlawful manner. The data are compiled from public records, contributory databases and proprietary analytics, and its accuracy is dependent upon these sources.

About CoreLogic
CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company’s combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.

CORELOGIC, the CoreLogic logo, CoreLogic HPI, CoreLogic HPI Forecast and HPI are trademarks of CoreLogic, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries.

Contacts

CoreLogic
For real estate industry and trade media:
Bill Campbell
(212) 995-8057
bill@campbelllewis.com

or

For general news media:
Lori Guyton
(901) 277-6066
lguyton@cvic.com

Average U.S. Home Seller Profits At 10-Year High Of $54,000 In Q4 2017

But Homeowners Staying Put Longer as Average Homeownership Tenure Rises to New High; Kansas City, San Jose, Nashville Led Major Metros in Home Price Appreciation in 2017; All-Cash Purchase Share Increases Following Four Years of Declines

Irvine, CA – Feb. 1, 2018 (PRNewswire) ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation’s largest multi-sourced property database, today released its Year-End and Q4 2017 U.S. Home Sales Report, which shows that home sellers in Q4 2017 realized an average home price gain since purchase of $54,000, up from $53,732 in the previous quarter and up from $47,133 in Q4 2016 to the highest since Q3 2007 — a more than 10-year high.

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That $54,000 average home seller profit represented an average 29.7 percent return on investment compared to the original purchase price, up from 28.8 percent in the previous quarter and up from 26.8 percent in Q4 2016 to the highest average home seller ROI since Q3 2007.

“It’s the most profitable time to sell a home in more than 10 years yet homeowners are staying put longer than we’ve ever seen,” said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions. “While home sellers on the West Coast are realizing the biggest profits, rapid home price appreciation in red state markets is rivaling that of the high-flying coastal markets and producing sizable profits for home sellers in those middle-American markets as well.”

Among 155 metropolitan statistical areas with sufficient historical data, those with the highest average home seller ROI were San Jose, California (90.9 percent ROI); San Francisco, California (73.3 percent); Merced, California (64.6 percent); Seattle, Washington (64.4 percent); and Santa Cruz, California (59.8 percent).

“The biggest story for the greater Seattle housing market in 2017 was persistently low inventory levels which continued to push home prices higher,” said Matthew Gardner, chief economist at Windermere Real Estate, covering the Seattle market. “Sales in King County dropped modestly, but that can be blamed on rising prices which are forcing many buyers to look in neighboring counties to the north and south of Seattle where homes are significantly less expensive. I expect more of the same in 2018; an ongoing shortage of inventory combined with an economy that continues to add jobs means the Seattle market will remain very competitive and increasingly expensive.”

Kansas City, San Jose, Nashville lead major metros in home price appreciation
The U.S. median home price in 2017 was $235,000, up 8.3 percent from 2016 to a new all-time high. Annual home price appreciation in 2017 slowed slightly compared to the 8.5 percent in 2016.

Among 112 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of 200,000 or more and sufficient home price data, those with the biggest year-over-year increase in home prices were Ocala, Florida (up 14.3 percent); Kansas City, Missouri (up 13.4 percent); San Jose, California (up 13.3 percent); Salem, Oregon (up 12.9 percent); and Nashville, Tennessee (up 12.5 percent).

Along with Kansas City, San Jose and Nashville, other major metro areas with a population of at least 1 million with a double-digit percentage increase in home prices in 2017 were Las Vegas (up 12.3 percent); Salt Lake City (up 10.9 percent); Seattle (up 10.8 percent); Orlando (up 10.7 percent); Tampa-St. Petersburg (up 10.7 percent); Portland (up 10.5 percent); and Jacksonville, Florida (up 10.1 percent).

64 of the 112 metros (57 percent) reached new record home price peaks in 2017, including Los Angeles, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, and San Francisco.

“Southern California closed out 2017 with sales volume increases, providing sellers with a continued positive rate of return growth on their homeowner equity, and we are forecasting a further bullish market in 2018,” said Michael Mahon, president of First Team Real Estate, covering the Southern California market. “Low available listing inventories, greater consumer cash flows from tax plan changes, continued gains in the stock market and continued declines in unemployment, are all contributing factors to high consumer confidence, which we believe will further elevate property values in 2018.”

“Although Ohio continues to work through a long tail of lingering distress, strong buyer demand for both distressed and non-distressed properties pushed home prices to new all-time highs in the majority of markets across the state,” said Matthew Watercutter, senior regional vice president and broker of record for HER Realtors, covering the Dayton, Columbus and Cincinnati markets in Ohio. “That strong buyer demand is evident in the increasing share of all-cash purchases statewide — more than one in three buyers in Ohio purchased with cash in 2017.”

Homeownership tenure at new record high nationwide, down in Denver, Dallas, Santa Cruz
Homeowners who sold in the fourth quarter of 2017 had owned their homes an average of 8.18 years, up from 8.12 years in the previous quarter and up from 7.78 years in Q4 2016 to the longest average home seller tenure as far back as data is available, Q1 2000.

Counter to the national trend, 10 of the 108 metro areas analyzed in the report posted a year-over-year decrease in average home seller tenure: Norwich-New London, Connecticut (down 5 percent); Denver, Colorado (down 3 percent); Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington (down 2 percent); Eugene, Oregon (down 2 percent); Colorado Springs, Colorado (down 2 percent); Provo-Orem, Utah (down 2 percent); Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas (down 1 percent); Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire (down 1 percent); Chattanooga, Tennessee (down less than 1 percent); and Santa Cruz, California (down less than 1 percent).

Cash sales share increases in 2017 following four years of declines
Nationwide all-cash purchases accounted for 29.0 percent of single family home and condo sales in 2017, up slightly from 28.7 percent in 2016 and still well above the pre-recession average of 20.3 percent between 2000 and 2007. The increase in cash sales share in 2017 followed four consecutive years of annual decreases.

Among 156 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and sufficient cash sales data, those with the highest share of all-cash purchases in 2017 were Mobile, Alabama (69.8 percent); Binghamton, New York (60.9 percent); Macon, Georgia (57.7 percent); and Columbus, Georgia (56.2 percent).

U.S. distressed sales share drops to 10-year low, up in 12 states and DC
Distressed home sales — including bank-owned (REO) sales, third-party foreclosure auction sales, and short sales — accounted for 14.0 percent of all U.S. single family home and condo sales in 2017, down from 15.5 percent in 2016 and down from a peak of 38.6 percent in 2011.

Counter to the national trend, the share of distressed sales increased in 2017 in the District of Columbia (up 31 percent) and 12 states, including Delaware (up 21 percent); New Jersey (up 9 percent); Ohio (up 6 percent); Louisiana (up 19 percent); and New York (up 10 percent).

Among 203 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 those with the highest share of distressed sales in 2017 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (39.4 percent); Mobile, Alabama (32.0 percent); Montgomery, Alabama (29.9 percent); Fayetteville, North Carolina (27.3 percent); and Akron, Ohio (25.3 percent).

Among 52 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 1 million, those with the highest share of distressed sales in 2017 were Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (23.8 percent); Baltimore, Maryland (23.1 percent); Cleveland, Ohio (22.8 percent); Memphis, Tennessee (20.4 percent); and Columbus, Ohio (20.2 percent).

Highest share of institutional investor purchases in Memphis
Institutional investors nationwide accounted for 2.6 percent of all single family home and condo sales in 2017, down from 3.0 percent in 2016.

Among 182 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and sufficient institutional investor sales data, those with the highest share of institutional investor sales in 2017 were Memphis, Tennessee (10.0 percent); Columbus, Georgia (8.6 percent); Birmingham, Alabama (8.3 percent); Killeen, Texas (7.3 percent); and Macon, Georgia (7.3 percent).

FHA buyer share at lowest level since 2014
Nationwide buyers using Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loans accounted for 13.6 percent of all single family home and condo purchases in 2017, down from 15.4 percent in 2016 to the lowest level since 2014 but still well above the pre-recession average of 7.0 percent between 2000 and 2007.

Among 182 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and sufficient FHA buyer data, those with the highest share of FHA buyers in 2017 were El Paso, Texas (29.4 percent); Beaumont-Port Arthur, Texas (27.9 percent); Merced, California (27.2 percent); Elkhart-Goshen, Indiana (26.3 percent); and Salt Lake City, Utah (24.4 percent).

Report methodology
The ATTOM Data Solutions U.S. Home Sales Report provides percentages of distressed sales and all sales that are sold to investors, institutional investors and cash buyers, a state and metropolitan statistical area. Data is also available at the county and zip code level upon request. The data is derived from recorded sales deeds, foreclosure filings and loan data. Statistics for previous quarters are revised when each new report is issued as more deed data becomes available for those previous months. Median sales price is calculated based on the sales price on the publicly recorded sales deed when available. If no sales price is recorded then the purchase loan amount is used to calculate median price, and if no purchase loan amount is available, the property’s Automated Valuation Model (AVM) at time of sale is used to calculate the median price.

Definitions
All-cash purchases: sales where no loan is recorded at the time of sale and where ATTOM has coverage of loan data.

Institutional investor purchases: residential property sales to non-lending entities that purchased at least 10 properties in a calendar year.

REO sale: a sale of a property that occurs while the property is actively bank owned (REO).

Third-party foreclosure auction sale: a sale of a property that occurs at the public foreclosure auction (trustee’s sale or sheriff’s sale) in which the property is sold to a third-party buyer and does not transfer back to the foreclosing bank.

Short sale: a sale of a property where the sale price is less than (short) the combined amount of loans secured by the property.

Data Licensing and Custom Report Order
Investors, businesses and government institutions can contact ATTOM Data Solutions to purchase the full dataset behind the Year-End U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, including data at the state, metro, county and zip code level. The data is also available via bulk license or in customized reports. For more information contact our Data Solutions Department at 800.462.5193 or datasales@attomdata.com.

About ATTOM Data Solutions
ATTOM Data Solutions is the curator of the ATTOM Data Warehouse, a multi-sourced national property database that blends property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, health hazards, neighborhood characteristics and other property characteristic data for more than 150 million U.S. residential and commercial properties. The ATTOM Data Warehouse delivers actionable data to businesses, consumers, government agencies, universities, policymakers and the media in multiple ways, including bulk file licenses, APIs and customized reports.

ATTOM Data Solutions also powers consumer websites designed to promote real estate transparency: RealtyTrac.com is a property search and research portal for foreclosures and other off-market properties; Homefacts.com is a neighborhood research portal providing hyperlocal risks and amenities information; HomeDisclosure.com produces detailed property pre-diligence reports.

ATTOM Data and its associated brands are cited by thousands of media outlets each month, including frequent mentions on CBS Evening News, The Today Show, CNBC, CNN, FOX News, PBS NewsHour and in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and USA TODAY.

Media Contact:

Christine Stricker
(949) 748-8428
christine.stricker@attomdata.com

Data and Report Licensing:
(949) 502-8313
datareports@attomdata.com

Pending Home Sales Tick Up 0.5 Percent in December

Washington, D.C. – January 31, 2018 (nar.realtor) Pending home sales were up slightly in December for the third consecutive month, according to the National Association of Realtors®. In 2018, existing-home sales and price growth are forecast to moderate, primarily because of the new tax law’s expected impact in high-cost housing markets.

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The Pending Home Sales Index,* www.nar.realtor/pending-home-sales, a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings, moved higher 0.5 percent to 110.1 in December from an upwardly revised 109.6 in November. With last month’s modest increase, the index is now 0.5 percent above a year ago.

Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, says pending sales edged up in December and reached their highest level since last March (111.3). “Another month of modest increases in contract activity is evidence that the housing market has a small trace of momentum at the start of 2018,” he said. “Jobs are plentiful, wages are finally climbing and the prospect of higher mortgage rates are perhaps encouraging more aspiring buyers to begin their search now.”

Added Yun, “Sadly, these positive indicators may not lead to a stronger sales pace. Buyers throughout the country continue to be hamstrung by record low supply levels that are pushing up prices — especially at the lower end of the market.”

The uninterrupted supply and demand imbalances throughout the country fueled price appreciation to 5.8 percent in 2017, which was the sixth straight year of gains at or above 5 percent(1). While tight inventories are still expected to put upward pressure on prices in most areas this year, Yun expects overall price growth to shrink, with some states even experiencing a decline, because of the negative effect the changes to the mortgage interest deduction and state and local deductions under the new tax law. To see NAR’s 2018 state forecast for a look at home price projections click here.

Real Estate Infographic

“In the short term, the larger paychecks most households will see from the tax cuts may give prospective buyers the ability to save for a larger down payment this year, and the healthy labor economy and job market will continue to boost demand,” said Yun. “However, there’s no doubt the nation’s most expensive markets with high property taxes are going to be adversely impacted by the tax law.”

Added Yun, “Just how severe is still uncertain, but with homeownership now less incentivized in the tax code, sellers in the upper end of the market may have to adjust their price expectations if they want to trade down or move to less expensive areas. This could in turn lead to both a decrease in sales and home values.”

After expanding 1.1 percent in 2017 to 5.51 million, Yun does anticipate a slight increase (0.5 percent) in existing sales this year (5.54 million). Single-family housing starts are forecast to jump 13.3 percent to 961,000, which will push new home sales up 15.3 percent to 701,000 (608,000 in 2016).

The PHSI in the Northeast dipped 5.1 percent to 93.9 in December, and is now 2.7 percent below a year ago. In the Midwest the index decreased 0.3 percent to 105.0 in December, but is still 0.3 percent higher than December 2016.

Pending home sales in the South grew 2.6 percent to an index of 126.9 in December and are now 4.0 percent higher than last December. The index in the West rose 1.5 percent in December to 101.7, but is still 3.1 percent below a year ago.

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

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1. From 2012-2017, the median sales price of existing homes has increased the following amounts: 6.6 percent; 11.4 percent; 5.8 percent; 6.5 percent; 5.1 percent and 5.8 percent.

* The Pending Home Sales Index is a leading indicator for the housing sector, based on pending sales of existing homes. A sale is listed as pending when the contract has been signed but the transaction has not closed, though the sale usually is finalized within one or two months of signing.

The index is based on a large national sample, typically representing about 20 percent of transactions for existing-home sales. In developing the model for the index, it was demonstrated that the level of monthly sales-contract activity parallels the level of closed existing-home sales in the following two months.

An index of 100 is equal to the average level of contract activity during 2001, which was the first year to be examined. By coincidence, the volume of existing-home sales in 2001 fell within the range of 5.0 to 5.5 million, which is considered normal for the current U.S. population.

NOTE: NAR’s January Housing Minute video will be shared later today at 2:00 p.m., the metropolitan area price report for the fourth quarter of 2017 will be released February 13, Existing-Home Sales for January will be reported February 21, and the next Pending Home Sales Index will be February 28; all release times are 10:00 a.m. ET.

Media Contact:

Adam DeSanctis
(202) 383-1178
Email