Snapchat Cements Its Must-Have Status Among U.S. Teens

Source: Statista

When it comes to their social media preferences, U.S. teens are about as loyal as Brutus was to Caesar. Back in 2013, Facebook was still their social network of choice. In 2014, Instagram took the throne for a while before being replaced by Snapchat in 2016.

Now, in the fall of 2017, Snapchat is the clear number 1 for teens in the United States, with nearly half of the 6,000+ teenagers polled for PiperJaffray’s bi-annual “Taking Stock With Teens” survey naming it their favorite social platform. 24 percent of the teenage respondents called Instagram their favorite, while Facebook and Twitter are losing touch with the teen demographic.

So how do these numbers translate into actual usage? Are teenagers really abandoning Facebook in droves? Not quite, apparently. According to this year’s spring edition of PiperJaffray’s report, more than half of U.S. teens still use Facebook at least once a month. The same holds true for Twitter, which is used regularly by 56 percent of U.S. teens. Snapchat and Instagram hold their ground in terms of usage as well: both are used at least monthly by around 80 percent of young Americans.

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Referral Traffic – Google or Facebook?

Source: statista.com

It’s a common conception that everybody finds everything online via a Google search. According to research by Parse.ly, though, this is actually far from the case. All told, the lion’s share of referral traffic comes from Facebook (although it should be noted that Google AMP is not included in the analysis).

Where the picture becomes a little less clear is when we break down the referrals by topic. Lifestyle page referrals, for example, are dominated by Facebook (87 percent) whereas people generally find job postings through Google Search (84 percent).

Facebook itself came under fire during and after the U.S. presidential election for allowing so-called fake news to circulate freely on its site. With 59 percent of referrals to pages on this topic in 2016 coming from the social network, the political power of Mark Zuckerberg’s company is clear to see.

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