Owners of the Least Expensive Homes Gaining Wealth Faster Than Any Other Homeowner

But tight inventory and strong demand for these homes make it difficult for buyers to enter the market

– Owners of starter homes have gained 44 percent in equity over the past five years, while owners of the most valuable homes have gained 27 percent over the same time period.

– Affordable homes in Tampa, Florida saw the greatest appreciation over the past year among the largest U.S. metros, gaining 20 percent in value.

– Seattle and the Bay Area are the only large markets where the most valuable homes are gaining value faster than affordable homes.

Seattle , WA – Feb. 16, 2018 (PRNewswire) Owners of starter homes across the country are gaining equity faster than other homeowners because demand for entry-level homes continues to grow faster than supply.

The phenomenon – which has become more pronounced over the past few years — underscores the power of homeownership to build wealth, particularly among the middle class.

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For this analysis, Zillow® divided the U.S. housing stock into equal thirds based on value and determined the median value of the most and least valuable homes. Over the past year, homes in the most affordable segment of the market, which are often sought after by first-time buyers, gained 8.5 percent in value, compared to a 3.6 percent gain for the most expensive homes. Over the past five years, the difference is even more noticeable — people who own starter homes have seen their equity grow by 44.4 percent, while owners of top-tier homes have gained 26.6 percent.

A home is the biggest financial asset and a significant share of net worth for many homeowners. Less affluent homeowners typically have more of their wealth in their homes than homeowners with a higher net worthi. Owners of more affordable homes are seeing their homes’ value, and therefore their overall wealth, grow rapidly.

“When the housing market crashed, owners of the least valuable homes were especially hard hit, and lost more home value than homeowners at the upper end of the market,” said Zillow senior economist Aaron Terrazas. “Since then, though, demand for less expensive, entry-level homes has built steadily, causing prices to grow rapidly. As a result, these homeowners have been able to build wealth at a faster pace than owners of more expensive homes.”

Strong home value appreciation among more affordable homes is beneficial for people who own those homes, but also makes it difficult for buyers trying to enter the market. Inventory among the most affordable homes is extremely limited, making for a highly competitive market going into home shopping season — there are nearly 18 percent fewer entry-level homes available now than a year ago.

Among the largest U.S. housing markets, owners of the cheapest homes in Tampa, Florida are seeing the greatest gains in home equity. Over the past year, these homes have gained 20.4 percent in value. Las Vegas homeowners are close behind. The most affordable homes there have appreciated 19.9 percent from last year.

San Francisco, Seattle and San Jose, California are the only large markets where the most expensive homes are gaining value faster than starter homes.

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Zillow

Zillow is the leading real estate and rental marketplace dedicated to empowering consumers with data, inspiration and knowledge around the place they call home, and connecting them with the best local professionals who can help. In addition, Zillow operates an industry-leading economics and analytics bureau led by Zillow’s Chief Economist Dr. Svenja Gudell. Dr. Gudell and her team of economists and data analysts produce extensive housing data and research covering more than 450 markets at Zillow Real Estate Research. Zillow also sponsors the quarterly Zillow Home Price Expectations Survey, which asks more than 100 leading economists, real estate experts and investment and market strategists to predict the path of the Zillow Home Value Index over the next five years. Launched in 2006, Zillow is owned and operated by Zillow Group, Inc. (NASDAQ: Z and ZG), and headquartered in Seattle.

Zillow is a registered trademark of Zillow, Inc.

(i) https://www.zillow.com/research/black-hispanic-home-wealth-16753/

End of 2017 Sees Homeowners and Appraisers More In Agreeance than in the Past Two Years

– Quicken Loans’ National HPPI shows appraised values 0.50% lower than homeowners estimated in December

– Home values rose 0.65% nationally in December, with a 6.17% year-over-year increase, according to the Quicken Loans HVI

Detroit, MI – Jan. 9, 2018 (PRNewswire) The views of homeowners, and those who appraise their properties, are continuing to move closer together. Home appraisals were an average of 0.5 percent lower than what owners expected in December, according to the National Quicken Loans Home Price Perception Index (HPPI). These two data points have moved closer together since November, when appraised values were 0.67 percent lower than homeowners’ estimates, and far improved from one year ago when there was a full 1 percent difference in valuation.

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Increasing equity continues to be another source of good news for homeowners. The National Quicken Loans Home Value Index (HVI) reported the average appraisal value climbed 0.65 percent higher from November to December, and jolted ahead 6.17 percent compared to the previous December.

Home Price Perception Index (HPPI)

Appraisals in December were an average of 0.5 percent lower than what homeowners estimated at the beginning of the mortgage process. Although the average appraisal continues to lag homeowner estimates, the gap between the two numbers was narrower in December than it has been since March 2015. The current narrowing trend is in its seventh-straight month. While perceptions vary between metro areas, they are improving at the metro level. A negative value, which indicates that appraiser opinions are lower than homeowner perceptions, was only indicated in a quarter of metro areas measured by the HPPI.

“Appraisers and real estate professionals evaluate their local housing markets daily. Homeowners, on the other hand, may only think about their housing market when they see ‘for sale’ signs hit front yards in the spring or when they think about accessing their equity,” said Bill Banfield, Quicken Loans Executive Vice President of Capital Markets. “This is reflected in the HPPI. The housing markets that are rising quickly, like those in the West, are having appraisal values increasing above owner estimates because owners don’t realize just how quickly those markets are advancing.”

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Home Value Index (HVI)

The HVI, the only measure of home value change based solely on appraisal data, showed promising growth. Values rose 0.5 percent from November to December, and 2017 ended on a strong note with the HVI rising 6.54 percent from January to December. The Northeast is the only region to show a monthly dip in value, but all regions reported annual growth – topping out with a 7.42 percent jump in the West.

“Homeowners received the gift of added equity this holiday season,” said Banfield. “With several years of growth, owners may have more equity than they realize. Many consumers use the tax season at the beginning of the year to reevaluate their entire financial life. It also provides a good opportunity for them to consider how best to take advantage of their equity while mortgage interest rates and borrowing costs are still near record lows.”

Chart 1

*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

Chart 2

*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

Chart 3

*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

About the HPPI & HVI

The Quicken Loans HPPI represents the difference between appraisers’ and homeowners’ opinions of home values. The index compares the estimate that the homeowner supplies on a refinance mortgage application to the appraisal that is performed later in the mortgage process. This is an unprecedented report that gives a never-before-seen analysis of how homeowners are viewing the housing market. The HPPI national composite is determined by analyzing appraisal and homeowner estimates throughout the entire country, including data points from both inside and outside the metro areas specifically called out in the above report.

The Quicken Loans HVI is the only view of home value trends based solely on appraisal data from home purchases and mortgage refinances. This produces a wide data set and is focused on appraisals, one of the most important pieces of information to the mortgage process.

The HPPI and HVI are released on the second Tuesday of every month. Both of the reports are created with Quicken Loans’ propriety mortgage data from the 50-state lenders’ mortgage activity across all 3,000+ counties. The indexes are examined nationally, in four geographic regions and the HPPI is reported for 27 major metropolitan areas. All indexes, along with downloadable tables and graphs can be found at QuickenLoans.com/Indexes.

About Quicken Loans

Detroit-based Quicken Loans Inc. is the nation’s second largest retail home mortgage lender. The company closed more than $400 billion of mortgage volume across all 50 states from 2013 through 2017. Quicken Loans moved its headquarters to downtown Detroit in 2010, and now more than 17,000 team members from Quicken Loans and its Family of Companies work in the city’s urban core. The company generates loan production from web centers located in Detroit, Cleveland and Scottsdale, Arizona. The company also operates a centralized loan processing facility in Detroit, as well as its San Diego-based One Reverse Mortgage unit.

Quicken Loans ranked “Highest in Customer Satisfaction for Primary Mortgage Origination” in the United States by J.D. Power for the past eight consecutive years, 2010 – 2017, and highest in customer satisfaction among all mortgage servicers the past four years, 2014 – 2017.

Quicken Loans was ranked No. 10 on FORTUNE magazine’s annual “100 Best Companies to Work For” list in 2017, and has been among the top 30 companies for the past 14 consecutive years. The company has been recognized as one of Computerworld magazine’s “100 Best Places to Work in IT” the past 13 years, ranking No. 1 for eight of the past 12 years, including 2017. The company is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Rock Holdings, Inc., the parent company of several FinTech and related businesses. Quicken Loans is also the flagship business of Dan Gilbert’s Family of Companies comprising nearly 100 affiliated businesses spanning multiple industries. For more information and company news visit QuickenLoans.com/press-room.

CoreLogic Reports Homeowner Equity Increased by Almost $871 Billion in Q3 2017

260,000 Mortgaged Properties Regained Equity Between Q2 2017 and Q3 2017
The Number of Underwater Homes Decreased Year Over Year by 0.7 Million
2.5 Million Residential Properties with a Mortgage Still in Negative Equity

Irvine, CA – December 07, 2017 (BUSINESS WIRE) CoreLogic® (NYSE: CLGX), a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its Q3 2017 home equity analysis which shows that U.S. homeowners with mortgages (roughly 63 percent of all homeowners*) have collectively seen their equity increase 11.8 percent year over year, representing a gain of $870.6 billion since Q3 2016.

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Additionally, homeowners gained an average of $14,888 in home equity between Q3 2016 and Q3 2017. Western states led the increase, while no state experienced a decrease. Washington homeowners gaining an average of approximately $40,000 in home equity and California homeowners gaining an average of approximately $37,000 in home equity (Figure 1).

On a quarter-over-quarter basis, from Q2 2017** to Q3 2017, the total number of mortgaged homes in negative equity decreased 9 percent to 2.5 million homes, or 4.9 percent of all mortgaged properties. Year over year, negative equity decreased 22 percent from 3.2 million homes, or 6.3 percent of all mortgaged properties, from Q3 2016 to Q3 2017.

“Homeowner equity increased by almost $871 billion over the last 12 months, the largest increase in more than three years,” said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. “This increase is primarily a reflection of rising home prices, which drives up home values, leading to an increase in home equity positions and supporting consumer spending.”

Negative equity, often referred to as being “underwater” or “upside down,” applies to borrowers who owe more on their mortgages than their homes are worth. Negative equity can occur because of a decline in a home’s value, an increase in mortgage debt or both.

Negative equity peaked at 26 percent of mortgaged residential properties in Q4 2009 based on CoreLogic equity data analysis, which began in Q3 2009.

The national aggregate value of negative equity was approximately $275.7 billion at the end of Q3 2017. This is down quarter over quarter by approximately $9.1 billion, or 3.2 percent, from $284.8 billion in Q2 2017 and down year over year by approximately $9.5 billion, or 3.3 percent, from $285.2 billion in Q3 2016.

“While homeowner equity is rising nationally, there are wide disparities by geography,” said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. “Hot markets like San Francisco, Seattle and Denver boast very high levels of increased home equity. However, some markets are lagging behind due to weaker economies or lingering effects from the great recession. These include large markets such as Miami, Las Vegas and Chicago, but also many small- and medium-sized markets such as Scranton, Pa. and Akron, Ohio.”

* Homeownership mortgage source: 2016 American Community Survey.

** Q2 2017 data was revised. Revisions with public records data are standard, and to ensure accuracy, CoreLogic incorporates the newly released public data to provide updated results.

For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: http://www.corelogic.com/blog.

Methodology

The amount of equity for each property is determined by comparing the estimated current value of the property against the mortgage debt outstanding (MDO). If the MDO is greater than the estimated value, then the property is determined to be in a negative equity position. If the estimated value is greater than the MDO, then the property is determined to be in a positive equity position. The data is first generated at the property level and aggregated to higher levels of geography. CoreLogic data includes more than 50 million properties with a mortgage, which accounts for more than 95 percent of all mortgages in the U.S. CoreLogic uses public record data as the source of the MDO, which includes both first-mortgage liens and second liens, and is adjusted for amortization and home equity utilization in order to capture the true level of MDO for each property. The calculations are not based on sampling, but rather on the full data set to avoid potential adverse selection due to sampling. The current value of the property is estimated using a suite of proprietary CoreLogic valuation techniques, including valuation models and the CoreLogic Home Price Index (HPI). In August 2016, the CoreLogic HPI was enhanced to include nearly one million additional repeat sales records from proprietary data sources that provide greater coverage in home price changes nationwide. The increased coverage is particularly useful in 14 non-disclosure states. Additionally, a new modeling methodology has been added to the HPI to weight outlier pairs, ensuring increased consistency and reducing month-over-month revisions. The use of the enhanced CoreLogic HPI was implemented with the Q2 2016 Equity report. Only data for mortgaged residential properties that have a current estimated value are included. There are several states or jurisdictions where the public record, current value or mortgage data coverage is thin and have been excluded from the analysis. These instances account for fewer than 5 percent of the total U.S. population.

Source: CoreLogic

The data provided is for use only by the primary recipient or the primary recipient’s publication or broadcast. This data may not be re-sold, republished or licensed to any other source, including publications and sources owned by the primary recipient’s parent company without prior written permission from CoreLogic. Any CoreLogic data used for publication or broadcast, in whole or in part, must be sourced as coming from CoreLogic, a data and analytics company. For use with broadcast or web content, the citation must directly accompany first reference of the data. If the data is illustrated with maps, charts, graphs or other visual elements, the CoreLogic logo must be included on screen or web site. For questions, analysis or interpretation of the data contact Lori Guyton at lguyton@cvic.com or Bill Campbell at bill@campbelllewis.com. Data provided may not be modified without the prior written permission of CoreLogic. Do not use the data in any unlawful manner. This data is compiled from public records, contributory databases and proprietary analytics, and its accuracy depends upon these sources.

About CoreLogic

CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company’s combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.

CORELOGIC and the CoreLogic logo are trademarks of CoreLogic, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Contacts

CoreLogic
For real estate industry and trade media:
Bill Campbell, (212) 995-8057
bill@campbelllewis.com
or
For general news media:
Lori Guyton, (901) 277-6066
lguyton@cvic.com

Realtors®: Senate-Passed Tax Legislation Bad News for Homeowners

Washington, D.C. December 2, 2017 (nar.realtor) The U.S. Senate today passed tax reform legislation that the National Association of Realtors® believes puts home values at risk and dramatically undercuts the incentive to own a home.

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NAR President Elizabeth Mendenhall, a sixth-generation Realtor® from Columbia, Missouri and CEO of RE/MAX Boone Realty, offered strong concerns over the bill and said Realtors® will continue to work with members of the House and Senate as the process moves forward into a conference committee.

“The tax incentives to own a home are baked into the overall value of homes in every state and territory across the country. When those incentives are nullified in the way this bill provides, our estimates show that home values stand to fall by an average of more than 10 percent, and even greater in high-cost areas.

“Realtors® support tax cuts when done in a fiscally responsible way; while there are some winners in this legislation, millions of middle-class homeowners would see very limited benefits, and many will even see a tax increase. In exchange for that, they’ll also see much or all of their home equity evaporate as $1.5 trillion is added to the national debt and piled onto the backs of their children and grandchildren.

“That’s a poor foot to put forward, but this isn’t the end of the road. Realtors® will continue to advocate for homeownership and hope members of the House and Senate will listen to the concerns of America’s 75 million homeowners as the tax reform discussion continues.”

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

Media Contact:

Jon Boughtin
(202) 383-1193
Email

Quicken Loans Study Shows Homeowners and Appraisers Don’t See Eye-to-Eye on Home Values

– Quicken Loans’ National HPPI shows appraised values 1.55% lower than homeowners estimated in July

– Home values rose 0.33% nationally in July, with a 4.21% year-over-year increase, according to the Quicken Loans HVI

Detroit, MI – Aug. 8, 2017 (PRNewswire) Homeowners across the country continue to view their property value higher than appraisers’ opinions. In July, the average spread between an owner’s estimate and the appraised value was 1.55 percent according to Quicken Loans’ National Home Price Perception Index (HPPI). Despite the national average, the range of perceptions varied across the country with valuations coming in higher than expected in some metro areas.

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Even with the varying opinions there has been a clear trend, with home values on the rise across the country. The Quicken Loans National Home Value Index (HVI) reported that appraised values increased an average of 0.33 percent from June to July. The growth is even stronger on a year-over-year basis, with home values rising 4.21 percent nationally from July 2016’s findings.

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Home Price Perception Index (HPPI)
The HPPI shows appraisers’ opinions fell short of homeowners’ expectations by 1.55 percent, in July. This shows a narrowing gap, as homeowner estimates in June were 1.70 percent lower than appraised values. HPPI tracks differing trends across the country as real estate often fluctuates on a local basis. On average, appraisals were higher than owner expectations – the inverse of the national trend – in some of the fastest growing housing markets, including Dallas and Denver. However, some metro areas in the Northeast and the Midwest regions reported appraised values lower than owner estimates at a higher rate than the national trend.

“The home appraisal is one of the most important data points in the mortgage process. It determines the level of equity the homeowner has and, if the owner’s estimate is too far from how the appraiser views the property, it can cause the mortgage to be restructured,” said Bill Banfield, Quicken Loans Executive Vice President of Capital Markets. “Our hope is that this index is eye-opening for homeowners. Their home equity could be thousands of dollars higher, or lower, than they realize. If they are aware of the perceived trends in their area it could help them better prepare for their home purchase or refinance.”

Home Value Index (HVI)
The National HVI, based solely on appraisal data, reported home values rose an average of 0.33 percent in July. The positive momentum was even more substantial for the annual measure, showing a 4.21 percent increase year-over-year. All of the areas measured also reported annual home value growth – ranging from a 2.65 percent annual increase in the Northeast to a 5.64 percent annual rise in value in the West.

“The regional differences in home value growth mirror the perception difference across the country. Areas with slower growth were more likely to have owners overestimating their home value, and areas with much stronger growth had higher appraisals than owners realized they would be,” said Banfield. “With home values constantly changing, and the rates of change varying across the country, this is one more way to show how important it is for homeowners to stay aware of their local housing market.”

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*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

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*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

Chart

*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

About the HPPI & HVI
The Quicken Loans HPPI represents the difference between appraisers’ and homeowners’ opinions of home values. The index compares the estimate that the homeowner supplies on a refinance mortgage application to the appraisal that is performed later in the mortgage process. This is an unprecedented report that gives a never-before-seen analysis of how homeowners are viewing the housing market. The HPPI national composite is determined by analyzing appraisal and homeowner estimates throughout the entire country, including data points from both inside and outside the metro areas specifically called out in the above report.

The Quicken Loans HVI is the only view of home value trends based solely on appraisal data from home purchases and mortgage refinances. This produces a wide data set and is focused on appraisals, one of the most important pieces of information to the mortgage process.

The HPPI and HVI are released on the second Tuesday of every month. Both of the reports are created with Quicken Loans’ propriety mortgage data from the 50-state lenders’ mortgage activity across all 3,000+ counties. The indexes are examined nationally, in four geographic regions and the HPPI is reported for 27 major metropolitan areas. All indexes, along with downloadable tables and graphs can be found at QuickenLoans.com/Indexes.

About Quicken Loans
Detroit-based Quicken Loans Inc. is the nation’s second largest retail home mortgage lender. The company closed more than $300 billion of mortgage volume across all 50 states between 2013 and 2016. Quicken Loans moved its headquarters to downtown Detroit in 2010, and now more than 17,000 team members from Quicken Loans and its Family of Companies work in the city’s urban core. The company generates loan production from web centers located in Detroit, Cleveland and Scottsdale, Arizona. The company also operates a centralized loan processing facility in Detroit, as well as its San Diego-based One Reverse Mortgage unit. Quicken Loans ranked “Highest in Customer Satisfaction for Primary Mortgage Origination” in the United States by J.D. Power for the past seven consecutive years, 2010 – 2017, and highest in customer satisfaction among all mortgage servicers the past four years, 2014 – 2017.

Quicken Loans was ranked #10 on FORTUNE magazine’s annual “100 Best Companies to Work For” list in 2017, and has been among the top-30 companies for the past 14 consecutive years. The company has been recognized as one of Computerworld magazine’s ‘100 Best Places to Work in IT’ the past 13 years, ranking #1 for eight of the past twelve years including 2017. The company is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Rock Holdings, Inc., the parent company of several FinTech and related businesses. Quicken Loans is also the flagship business of Dan Gilbert’s Family of Companies comprising nearly 100 affiliated businesses spanning multiple industries. For more information and company news visit QuickenLoans.com/press-room.

Tax Reform Could Deliver a Tax Hike for Homeowners: New Research

Washington, D.C. – May 18, 2017 (PRNewswire) While tax reform proposals swirling around Washington, D.C., promise lower tax bills for American families, new estimates indicate that many middle-income homeowners may actually see a tax increase if those proposals go through.

NAR logo

The study, “Impact of Tax Reform Options on Owner-Occupied Housing,” illustrates the effects of a tax plan that echoes certain elements of the “Better Way for Tax Reform” or “Blueprint” proposal released last year, as well as the White House tax reform outline released in April, to which the National Association of Realtors® responded.

While most individuals would see a tax decrease under such a proposal, the study estimates that many middle-class homeowners could in fact see a net average tax increase. Homeowners with adjusted gross incomes between $50,000 and $200,000 would see their taxes rise by an average of $815. The study also estimates that combined tax savings from claiming the mortgage interest deduction and real estate property tax deductions would drop 82 percent between the 2018 and 2027 period.

“Tax reform and lower rates are worthy goals, but only if we can achieve them in a fiscally responsible way,” said NAR president William E. Brown, a second-generation Realtor® from Alamo, California and founder of Investment Properties. “Balancing tax reform on the backs of homeowners isn’t an option.”

The study, which was commissioned by NAR and prepared by PwC (PricewaterhouseCoopers), estimates that this tax increase would result from the interaction of several provisions in the reforms under consideration. For many homeowners that currently benefit from the mortgage interest deduction, the elimination of other itemized deductions and personal exemptions would cause their taxes to rise, even if they elected to take the increased standard deduction. For others, the elimination of the state and local tax deduction alone would result in higher federal income taxes.

In addition to increasing taxes on many middle-income homeowners, the report finds that such a proposal could cause home values to fall by an average of more than 10 percent in the near term. In areas with higher property taxes or state income taxes, the drop could be even greater. Although the study doesn’t directly analyze the “Better Way for Tax Reform” plan or the recent White House outline, it examines a proposal with many similar elements.

Those elements include lowering and consolidating marginal tax rates to only three rates, setting a top income tax rate of 33 percent, doubling the standard deduction, eliminating all itemized deductions (other than charitable contributions and mortgage interest) and personal exemptions, eliminating the alternative minimum tax, and capping the tax rate on pass-through business income at 25 percent.

PwC estimated that roughly 35 million households will claim the mortgage interest deduction in 2018, three quarters of which have incomes between $50,000 and $200,000. According to NAR, roughly 70 percent of those eligible for the MID claim it in a given tax year.

“A tax reform proposal that hikes taxes for homeowners is a raw deal, and consumers know it,” said Brown. “Leaders in Washington who are driving tax reform have shown every indication that they have the best of intentions, and we’re hopeful they’ll consider our study as this process plays out in the months ahead.”

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing over 1.2 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

Information about NAR is available at www.realtor.org. This and other news releases are posted in the “News, Blogs and Video” tab on the website.