The State of the U.S. Advertising Market

According to PwC’s latest Entertainment & Media Outlook, online advertising in the United States is poised for further growth in the next few years. PwC estimates that internet ad revenue could grow to $116.2 billion a year by 2021, up from $86.4 billion this year.

Fortunately for traditional media outlets, i.e. TV and radio broadcasters, newspaper and magazine publishers, advertising is not a zero sum game and a dollar spent online is not necessarily pried away from a dying newspaper. In fact, traditional media outlets are profiting from the digital ad boom themselves.

As our chart illustrates, print publishers as well as TV and radio broadcasters are expected to generate a significant chunk of their ad revenue online by 2021.

The State of the U.S. Advertising Market

The Top 10 Android Apps in the U.S.

The top ten Android apps in the U.S. last month had a combined download figure of 26 million. According to Priori Data, at the top of the list was Facebook’s Messenger app with 7.9 million. In fact, apps developed by Mark Zuckerberg’s company made up over half of the downloads on the list, with WhatsApp, Instagram, Messenger and Facebook accounting for a combined 13.8 million downloads in June.

Infographic: The Top 10 Android Apps in the U.S. | Statista You will find more statistics at Statista

Facebook Hits 2 Billion Active Users

The world’s largest social network continues to grow. As CEO and co-founder Mark Zuckerberg announced (on his Facebook page fittingly), Facebook now has more than 2 billion monthly active users.

It is hard to fathom what this number means, but let’s put it this way: what started in a Harvard dorm room in 2004 is now used by more than 1 in 4 people on planet earth. Considering that the company behind it all also owns Instagram and WhatsApp, two other immensely popular social media/messaging platforms, it is no surprise that Facebook is now one of the most valuable companies in the world.

Infographic: Facebook Hits 2 Billion Active Users | Statista You will find more statistics at Statista

War of the Words: Millenials vs. Baby Boomers

Source: Statista

Born out of the social and economic situation in which they grow up, every generation has a different outlook on life. To see an example of this, one only needs to compare Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) and Millennials (between early 1980’s and late 1990’s). A recent global survey by Ipsos Mori has revealed the differences in perception of both generations – not exactly to the favor of the younger group.

As our inforgraphic shows, the words most associated with Millennials are ‘tech-savvy’, ‘materialistic’, ‘selfish’, ‘lazy’ and ‘arrogant’. In contrast, Baby Boomers can boast ‘respectful’, ‘well-educated’ and ‘ethical’. More damning still, even Millennials themselves agreed with the judgement. 44 percent said their cohort was materialistic, 37 percent agreed they were selfish and 33 percent admitted that in general, their generation was lazy.

Infographic: War of the Words: Millenials vs. Baby Boomers | Statista You will find more statistics at Statista

The Best (And Worst) Cities for Renters

At a time when huge numbers of young people can’t afford to buy their own home, the rental market is booming. The alternative for the so-called Generation Rent isn’t exactly attractive either, though. As more and more people flock to the major cities for bigger salaries and better opportunities, property owners are able to cash in on an often out of control rental market.

The rent burden can be measured by looking at the share of the average household income that the typical rent eats into each month. As our infographic below shows, based on data from RENTCafé the worst place for renters is Mexico City. With an oppressive 60 percent of earnings going to the landlord.

Further north in the U.S., the situation isn’t too much better. With 59 percent of the average salary being poured into rent in Manhattan, the New York borough is the second worst place on the list to be a renter. Those looking to move to LA and San Francisco should be prepared to kiss goodbye to 47 and 41 percent of their pay packet, respectively. Of the cities focused on here, Chicago would be the best bet, at 38 percent.

RENTCafé’s benchmark for burden-free rent is 30 percent. With this in mind, Germany’s cool capital Berlin might be a good option. Alternatively, the city with the best ratio was found to be Kuala Lumpur. Anyone renting in the Malaysian capital will be free to spend up to as much as 80 percent of their income as they so desire.

This chart shows the share of household income required to pay rent in selected cities in 2017.

Infographic: The Best (And Worst) Cities for Renters | Statista You will find more statistics at Statista