Quicken Loans Study Shows Homeowners and Appraisers Don’t See Eye-to-Eye on Home Values

– Quicken Loans’ National HPPI shows appraised values 1.55% lower than homeowners estimated in July

– Home values rose 0.33% nationally in July, with a 4.21% year-over-year increase, according to the Quicken Loans HVI

Detroit, MI – Aug. 8, 2017 (PRNewswire) Homeowners across the country continue to view their property value higher than appraisers’ opinions. In July, the average spread between an owner’s estimate and the appraised value was 1.55 percent according to Quicken Loans’ National Home Price Perception Index (HPPI). Despite the national average, the range of perceptions varied across the country with valuations coming in higher than expected in some metro areas.

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Even with the varying opinions there has been a clear trend, with home values on the rise across the country. The Quicken Loans National Home Value Index (HVI) reported that appraised values increased an average of 0.33 percent from June to July. The growth is even stronger on a year-over-year basis, with home values rising 4.21 percent nationally from July 2016’s findings.

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Home Price Perception Index (HPPI)
The HPPI shows appraisers’ opinions fell short of homeowners’ expectations by 1.55 percent, in July. This shows a narrowing gap, as homeowner estimates in June were 1.70 percent lower than appraised values. HPPI tracks differing trends across the country as real estate often fluctuates on a local basis. On average, appraisals were higher than owner expectations – the inverse of the national trend – in some of the fastest growing housing markets, including Dallas and Denver. However, some metro areas in the Northeast and the Midwest regions reported appraised values lower than owner estimates at a higher rate than the national trend.

“The home appraisal is one of the most important data points in the mortgage process. It determines the level of equity the homeowner has and, if the owner’s estimate is too far from how the appraiser views the property, it can cause the mortgage to be restructured,” said Bill Banfield, Quicken Loans Executive Vice President of Capital Markets. “Our hope is that this index is eye-opening for homeowners. Their home equity could be thousands of dollars higher, or lower, than they realize. If they are aware of the perceived trends in their area it could help them better prepare for their home purchase or refinance.”

Home Value Index (HVI)
The National HVI, based solely on appraisal data, reported home values rose an average of 0.33 percent in July. The positive momentum was even more substantial for the annual measure, showing a 4.21 percent increase year-over-year. All of the areas measured also reported annual home value growth – ranging from a 2.65 percent annual increase in the Northeast to a 5.64 percent annual rise in value in the West.

“The regional differences in home value growth mirror the perception difference across the country. Areas with slower growth were more likely to have owners overestimating their home value, and areas with much stronger growth had higher appraisals than owners realized they would be,” said Banfield. “With home values constantly changing, and the rates of change varying across the country, this is one more way to show how important it is for homeowners to stay aware of their local housing market.”

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*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

Chart

*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

Chart

*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

About the HPPI & HVI
The Quicken Loans HPPI represents the difference between appraisers’ and homeowners’ opinions of home values. The index compares the estimate that the homeowner supplies on a refinance mortgage application to the appraisal that is performed later in the mortgage process. This is an unprecedented report that gives a never-before-seen analysis of how homeowners are viewing the housing market. The HPPI national composite is determined by analyzing appraisal and homeowner estimates throughout the entire country, including data points from both inside and outside the metro areas specifically called out in the above report.

The Quicken Loans HVI is the only view of home value trends based solely on appraisal data from home purchases and mortgage refinances. This produces a wide data set and is focused on appraisals, one of the most important pieces of information to the mortgage process.

The HPPI and HVI are released on the second Tuesday of every month. Both of the reports are created with Quicken Loans’ propriety mortgage data from the 50-state lenders’ mortgage activity across all 3,000+ counties. The indexes are examined nationally, in four geographic regions and the HPPI is reported for 27 major metropolitan areas. All indexes, along with downloadable tables and graphs can be found at QuickenLoans.com/Indexes.

About Quicken Loans
Detroit-based Quicken Loans Inc. is the nation’s second largest retail home mortgage lender. The company closed more than $300 billion of mortgage volume across all 50 states between 2013 and 2016. Quicken Loans moved its headquarters to downtown Detroit in 2010, and now more than 17,000 team members from Quicken Loans and its Family of Companies work in the city’s urban core. The company generates loan production from web centers located in Detroit, Cleveland and Scottsdale, Arizona. The company also operates a centralized loan processing facility in Detroit, as well as its San Diego-based One Reverse Mortgage unit. Quicken Loans ranked “Highest in Customer Satisfaction for Primary Mortgage Origination” in the United States by J.D. Power for the past seven consecutive years, 2010 – 2017, and highest in customer satisfaction among all mortgage servicers the past four years, 2014 – 2017.

Quicken Loans was ranked #10 on FORTUNE magazine’s annual “100 Best Companies to Work For” list in 2017, and has been among the top-30 companies for the past 14 consecutive years. The company has been recognized as one of Computerworld magazine’s ‘100 Best Places to Work in IT’ the past 13 years, ranking #1 for eight of the past twelve years including 2017. The company is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Rock Holdings, Inc., the parent company of several FinTech and related businesses. Quicken Loans is also the flagship business of Dan Gilbert’s Family of Companies comprising nearly 100 affiliated businesses spanning multiple industries. For more information and company news visit QuickenLoans.com/press-room.

Regulations, Retention and Recruitment Pressing Issues for Appraisal Industry

Washington, D.C. – May 17, 2017 (nar.realtor) Any perceived shortage of appraisers may be location specific and dependent on whom you ask, but there is universal agreement that more needs to be done to keep appraisers in the profession and attract new talent. That’s according to panelists yesterday at a property valuation forum at the 2017 REALTORS® Legislative Meetings & Trade Expo.

NAR logo

The conversation with property valuation experts comes at a time of numerous challenges within the industry. NAR’s Appraiser Trends Study released earlier this year underlined many of the ongoing issues in the profession, including regulatory burdens, insufficient compensation, and dissatisfaction in the work leading to what some say is a shortage of appraisers.

Providing their insights on these issues and ways Realtors® can communicate more effectively with appraisers were David S. Bunton, president and CEO of The Appraisal Foundation; James Park, executive director at the Appraisal Subcommittee; and Jim Amorin, 2017 president at the Appraisal Institute. Susan Martins-Phipps, a Realtor® and certified residential appraiser, moderated the session.

Appraiser Trends Study 03/16/17 by REALTORS® on Scribd

Much of the discussion during the session focused on balancing the need for appropriate regulation without overly burdening the industry. Sharing their own experiences, Bunton and Amorin discussed how the multiple federal, state and international standards can conflict with each other at times and cause confusion, frustration and an inability to appropriately serve the needs of clients.

Citing NAR’s appraisal survey, Amorin said that excessive regulation is the number one reason appraisers are leaving the industry, along with decreased fees and increased expenses. While regulation serves its purpose, Amorin stressed the need for ‘appropriate updating’ given that technology and consumer preferences have changed over the past decade.

“Appraisers are being crushed in the current regulatory environment and there are fewer people entering the profession,” said Amorin. “There are changes that can be put into place that make the process easier for everyone and not put added costs on the consumer.”

According to Park, public trust in the appraisal profession is important, and while there are certainly challenges in the industry, few of those challenges have to do with federal regulation. He also said outside of a few areas, he believes there is not a shortage of appraisal professionals. Citing the lower mortgage volume compared to the early 2000’s, Park said the number of active appraisers is proportionate to the current level of work in most of the country.

Amorin added that although the number of appraisers have declined around 23 percent since 2007, any actual shortages are primarily in some rural areas, and what some see as a shortage in quantity is actually just a dearth of appraisers willing to work for the low fees that have failed to keep up with inflation. However, Amorin did sound the alarm on what could be an inadequate number of appraisers in the future.

“The number of new entrants into the business is abysmally low, and a looming shortage is something we should be concerned about,” said Amorin. “The typical appraiser is in their mid-50s. We’ve got to find a way to make the profession more attractive and lucrative so that technology doesn’t completely take over the valuation process.”

Bunton agreed with Amorin and indicated he’s hopeful an improving housing market will bring more individuals, including millennials, to the industry. “If you’re a millennial, what’s not to like? You get to use technology, the hours are flexible and there’s always work,” he said.

The end of the session focused on bettering the appraisal process for the greater benefit of the real estate industry. While appraisers must maintain their independence, Amorin stressed the important role real estate agents can play in helping serve their clients and improve the work of appraisers. He said to applause from the crowd that it’s certainly fine for agents to talk to appraisers as long as they aren’t putting undo pressure on them.

“Regarding the relationship between appraisers and Realtors®, my message to Realtors® is to help them help you,” said Amorin.

To improve the overall appraisal experience, Bunton concluded that real estate agents should be more involved with The Appraisal Foundation and its boards to stay abreast of the issues. “Nearly half of Realtors® are on our boards, and we would certainly like to see that number even higher,” he said. “Less friction and more commonality on how to make the system more cohesive for everyone will ensure a better process.”

NAR submitted a letter late last year to the Appraiser Qualifications Board in response to their efforts to improve recruitment and retention of new appraisers. Knowing the integral part appraisers are to real estate transactions, NAR supports AQB’s revisions to some of the education and experience requirements to bring new appraisers to the industry.

For more information on NAR’s valuation activities and advocacy efforts, visit www.nar.realtor/appraisal.

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1.2 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

Media Contact:

Adam DeSanctis
(202) 383-1178
Email

Appraisal Values Lag Homeowner Expectations, Quicken Loans Study Shows

– Quicken Loans’ National HPPI shows appraised values were 1.90% lower than homeowners estimated in April

– Home values rose 1.06% nationally in April, with a 5.08% year-over-year increase, according to the Quicken Loans HVI

Detroit, MI – May 9, 2017 (PRNewswire) Homeowner and appraiser views of home values are diverging more each month. In April, appraisals were an average of 1.90 percent lower than what the owner expected, according to the National Quicken Loans Home Price Perception Index (HPPI). This is the fifth consecutive month the gap between appraiser opinions and homeowner estimates of home value widened.

Quicken Loans Logo

While the HPPI shows a widening perception gap, appraised values continue to rise at a steady pace. The National Home Value Index (HVI), the only measure of home value change based solely on appraisals, showed values rose 1.06 percent in April. Home values also increased when viewed annually, rising 5.08 percent year-over-year.

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Home Price Perception Index (HPPI)
Owner estimates of home values were higher than appraiser opinions by 1.90 percent, as reported by the national HPPI. This is compared to a 1.77 percent disparity between home value opinions in March. April marks the fourth month the spread between home value opinions widened nationally. A wide range of perceptions persists across the country, but month-to-month change in most metros was minor. The study continues to find appraised values higher than expected in the West, while it was more likely to have appraisals lower than owners estimated in the Midwest and East.

“The appraisal is one of the most important data points in a mortgage transaction. This single number can impact how much money a buyer needs to bring to closing, or the equity that is available to the homeowner on a refinance,” said Quicken Loans Vice President of Capital Markets, Bill Banfield. “If homeowners have a grasp on home value differences throughout their local area, it can lead to a smoother mortgage process.”

Home Value Index (HVI)
Home value growth not only continued, but accelerated in April. The National HVI showed appraisal values rose 1.06 percent from the previous month and increased 5.08 percent since April 2016. This is compared to 3.30 percent year-over-year growth in March. All regions measured by the HVI show positive momentum, ranging from 3.54 percent annual growth in the Northeast to a 6.52 percent year-over-year increase in the West.

“Home values were pushed higher once again by the demand for housing outpacing the stock of available homes. This effect is intensified by the start of the spring buying season,” Banfield said. “While sellers are obviously thrilled as their investment continues to grow in value, this trend could make homebuyers set their sights on smaller homes or less pricey neighborhoods. I would encourage homeowners who are considering listing their home to take advantage of the opportunity they have in this sellers’ market.”

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*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

Chart

*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

Chart

*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

About the HPPI & HVI
The Quicken Loans HPPI represents the difference between appraisers’ and homeowners’ opinions of home values. The index compares the estimate that the homeowner supplies on a refinance mortgage application to the appraisal that is performed later in the mortgage process. This is an unprecedented report that gives a never-before-seen analysis of how homeowners are viewing the housing market. The HPPI national composite is determined by analyzing appraisal and homeowner estimates throughout the entire country, including data points from both inside and outside the metro areas specifically called out in the above report.

The Quicken Loans HVI is the only view of home value trends based solely on appraisal data from home purchases and mortgage refinances. This produces a wide data set and is focused on appraisals, one of the most important pieces of information to the mortgage process.

The HPPI and HVI are released on the second Tuesday of every month. Both of the reports are created with Quicken Loans’ propriety mortgage data from the 50-state lenders’ mortgage activity across all 3,000+ counties. The indexes are examined nationally, in four geographic regions and the HPPI is reported for 27 major metropolitan areas. All indexes, along with downloadable tables and graphs can be found at QuickenLoans.com/Indexes.

About Quicken Loans
Detroit-based Quicken Loans Inc. is the nation’s second largest retail home mortgage lender. The company has closed more than $300 billion of mortgage volume across all 50 states between 2013 and 2016. Quicken Loans moved its headquarters to downtown Detroit in 2010, and now more than 13,500 of its 16,000 team members work in the city’s urban core. The company generates loan production from web centers located in Detroit, Cleveland and Scottsdale, Arizona. The company also operates a centralized loan processing facility in Detroit, as well as its San Diego-based One Reverse Mortgage unit.

Quicken Loans ranked “Highest in Customer Satisfaction for Primary Mortgage Origination” in the United States by J.D. Power for the past seven consecutive years, 2010 – 2016, and highest in customer satisfaction among all mortgage servicers the past three years, 2014 – 2016. The company is owned by Rock Holdings, Inc., parent company of several FinTech businesses. Quicken Loans is also part of a Family of Companies comprising nearly 100 affiliated business spanning multiple industries. For more information, please visit QuickenLoans.com.

Lower-cost Home Renovations Offer Best Value: Appraisal Institute

Chicago, IL – April 18, 2017 (PRNewswire-USNewswire) The Appraisal Institute, the nation’s largest professional association of real estate appraisers, today advocated that homeowners pursue smaller-scale renovation projects in order to maximize their potential return on investment.

Appraisal Institute Logo

“The latest research shows that home improvements with a relatively low cost are most likely to generate a positive cost-to-value ratio,” said Appraisal Institute President Jim Amorin, MAI, SRA, AI-GRS. “Spending big dollars on major renovations doesn’t necessarily equate to a dollar-for-dollar return. In short: cost doesn’t necessarily equal value.”

According to Remodeling magazine’s most recent Cost vs. Value report, the projects with the highest expected return on investment are attic insulation (fiberglass), entry door replacement (steel), manufactured stone veneer and minor kitchen remodel. Other projects with potential payoffs, according to the report, are garage door replacement and siding replacement.

Amorin encouraged homeowners contemplating renovation projects to compare the planned improvement to what’s standard in the community.

“Projects that move a home well beyond community norms are typically not worth the cost when the owner sells the property,” Amorin said.

He also noted that homeowners might consider renovations simply for their personal enjoyment. While it’s nice to gain a solid return on investment, it’s certainly reasonable for property owners to upgrade just to enhance their quality of life, Amorin said.

For an unbiased analysis of what their home would be worth both before and after an improvement project, a homeowner can work with a qualified real estate appraiser – such as a Designated Member of the Appraisal Institute – to conduct a feasibility study.

The Appraisal Institute offers a free, informative brochure titled “Remodeling & Rehabbing,” which provides consumers with valuable advice on home improvement projects.

The Appraisal Institute is a global professional association of real estate appraisers, with nearly 19,000 professionals in almost 60 countries throughout the world. Its mission is to advance professionalism and ethics, global standards, methodologies, and practices through the professional development of property economics worldwide. Organized in 1932, the Appraisal Institute advocates equal opportunity and nondiscrimination in the appraisal profession and conducts its activities in accordance with applicable federal, state and local laws. Individuals of the Appraisal Institute benefit from an array of professional education and advocacy programs, and may hold the prestigious MAI, SRPA, SRA, AI-GRS and AI-RRS designations. Learn more at www.appraisalinstitute.org.

Quicken Loans’ Measure of Home Value Perception Shows Appraisals Lagging Behind Owner Estimates

Quicken Loans’ National HPPI shows appraised values were 1.69% lower than homeowners estimated in February

Home values rise 0.55% nationally, with a 2.95% year-over-year increase, according to the Quicken Loans HVI

Detroit, MI – March 14th, 2017 (PRNewswire) Homeowners and appraisers are still not seeing eye-to-eye. Home appraisals were an average of 1.69 percent lower than what homeowners expected in February, according to the National Home Price Perception Index (HPPI). The current trend of appraisals falling lower than homeowner estimates started in February 2015, and the gap between the two values has now widened for the third consecutive month.

Quicken Loans Logo

Home appraisals rose in value by an average of 0.55 percent in February, as measured by the National Home Value Index (HVI). Additionally, appraisal values increased 2.95 percent year-over-year. The index rose in all regions measured.

Home Price Perception Index (HPPI)

Appraisal values continue to fall below homeowner estimates nationally, and in just less than half of the 27 metro areas examined. The National HPPI shows homeowners’ estimated values were an average of 1.69 percent higher than appraisers’ home value opinions in February. While this national average continues to show lower values than homeowner estimates, there are still metro areas showing appraiser opinions that are higher than what homeowners expected. Many of these are western cities with rapid home appreciation, including Denver, Portland, Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles.

“Quicken Loans is in a unique position, with access to two valuable data points. Homeowners tell us what they think their home is worth at the beginning of the mortgage process, then we compare that with the appraiser’s opinion of value,” said Quicken Loans Vice President of Capital Markets, Bill Banfield. “We hope consumers will take advantage of this information, seeing how their neighbors are perceiving their housing market, so they can better understand their own home’s value.”

Home Value Index (HVI)

The National HVI showed the country’s appraisal values rose an average of 0.55 percent from January to February. In addition to this modest increase, home values reached a level 2.95 percent higher than February 2016. This trend was reflected in regional values, with the West leading the way by posting a 4.45 percent year-over-year increase. The Midwest again trailed the rest of the country with an annual increase of just 0.47 percent.

“Low levels of home inventory persists as the main driver of home value growth,” said Banfield. “There are still plenty of interested buyers vying for a slim amount of homes for sale – pushing prices higher. Home values are likely to move higher in the Midwest as the spring buying season approaches, unless the number of homes available increases.”

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*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions.
A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

Chart

*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions.
A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

Chart

*A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions.
A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

About the HPPI & HVI

The Quicken Loans HPPI represents the difference between appraisers’ and homeowners’ opinions of home values. The index compares the estimate that the homeowner supplies on a refinance mortgage application to the appraisal that is performed later in the mortgage process. This is an unprecedented report that gives a never-before-seen analysis of how homeowners are viewing the housing market. The HPPI national composite is determined by analyzing appraisal and homeowner estimates throughout the entire country, including data points from both inside and outside the metro areas specifically called out in the above report.

The Quicken Loans HVI is the only view of home value trends based solely on appraisal data from home purchases and mortgage refinances. This produces a wide data set and is focused on appraisals, one of the most important pieces of information to the mortgage process.

The HPPI and HVI are released on the second Tuesday of every month. Both of the reports are created with Quicken Loans’ propriety mortgage data from the 50-state lenders’ mortgage activity across all 3,000+ counties. The indexes are examined nationally, in four geographic regions and the HPPI is reported for 27 major metropolitan areas. All indexes, along with downloadable tables and graphs can be found at QuickenLoans.com/Indexes.

About Quicken Loans

Detroit-based Quicken Loans Inc. is the nation’s second largest retail home mortgage lender. The company has closed over $300 billion of mortgage volume across all 50 states between 2013 and 2016. Quicken Loans generates loan production from web centers located in Detroit, Cleveland and Scottsdale, Arizona. The company also operates a centralized loan processing facility in Detroit, as well as its San Diego-based One Reverse Mortgage unit. Quicken Loans ranked “Highest in Customer Satisfaction for Primary Mortgage Origination” in the United States by J.D. Power for the past seven consecutive years, 2010 – 2016, and highest in customer satisfaction among all mortgage servicers the past three years, 2014 – 2016.

Quicken Loans was ranked #10 on FORTUNE magazine’s annual “100 Best Companies to Work For” list in 2017, and has been among the top-30 companies for the last 14 years. It has been recognized as one of Computerworld magazine’s ‘100 Best Places to Work in IT’ the past 12 years, ranking #1 for seven of the past eleven years including 2016. The company moved its headquarters to downtown Detroit in 2010, and now more than 12,000 of its 16,000 team members work in the city’s urban core. For more information about Quicken Loans, please visit QuickenLoans.com.

Perception Is Everything: Quicken Loans Study Finds Appraisers View Home Values Nearly 2% Lower Than Owners Estimate

– Quicken Loans National HPPI: appraised values were 1.93% lower than homeowners estimated in June.

– Home values increased 0.84% in June and rose 4.47% year-over-year, according to the national HVI.

Detroit, MI – July 12, 2016 (PRNewswire) Quicken Loans, the nation’s second largest retail mortgage lender, today announced home values assigned by appraisers were 1.93 percent lower than what homeowners estimated in June, according to the company’s national Home Price Perception Index (HPPI). The difference between value perceptions from appraisers and owners has slightly widened since May, when appraised values were 1.89 percent lower than expected.

Quicken Loans

Home valuations across the country rose in June, as reported by the Quicken Loans Home Value Index (HVI). The average home appraisal increased 0.84 percent since May and enjoyed a 4.47 percent boost since June 2015.

National Home Price Perception Index

Home Price Perception Index (HPPI)

The June HPPI shows appraised values are 1.93 percent lower nationally than what homeowners estimated. While this isn’t a large discrepancy, the gap between expected and actual appraisal values grew slightly since May. The perception of home value varies widely across the country. Appraisals show home values higher than owner expectations by as much as 3 percent in Denver but, in contrast, were more than 3 percent lower in Baltimore, Detroit and Philadelphia.

“Perception is everything. It can make or break a home sale or mortgage refinance,” said Quicken Loans Chief Economist Bob Walters. “That’s why it’s so important for homeowners to realize how they perceive their home’s value could vary widely from how an appraiser views it. If the estimate is lower by just a few percentage points, the buyer could need to bring as much as another several thousand dollars to the table to avoid having to restructure the loan.”

Home Value Index (HVI)

Continuing the slow upward march, appraised values rose by 0.84 percent from May to June – as measured by the national HVI. Home values are making stronger annual gains, rising 4.47 percent since June 2015. The regional data shows equally robust growth. Each of the four regions measured displayed modest monthly gains and more meaningful year-over-year growth. The West remains the leader with a 5.84 percent annual increase in appraised value. The Northeast posted the smallest increase with a rise of 2.07 since last year.

“Nationally, home value increases are well within the healthy range,” said Walters. “Although, the variances across the country can influence owners’ perception. Owners in the West, where appraised values are rising more quickly, tend to underestimate their home’s value. The opposite is true for those in the Northeast, with appraised values showing slower growth.

Table 1

* A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

Table 2

* A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

Table 3

* A positive value represents appraiser opinions that are higher than homeowner perceptions. A negative value represents appraiser opinions that are lower than homeowner perceptions.

About the HPPI & HVI

The Quicken Loans HPPI represents the difference between appraisers’ and homeowners’ opinions of home values. The index compares the estimate that the homeowner supplies on a refinance mortgage application to the appraisal that is performed later in the mortgage process. This is an unprecedented report that gives a never-before-seen analysis of how homeowners are viewing the housing market. The HPPI national composite is determined by analyzing appraisal and homeowner estimates throughout the entire country, including data points from both inside and outside the metro areas specifically called out in the above report.

The Quicken Loans HVI is the only view of home value trends based solely on appraisal data from home purchases and mortgage refinances. This produces a wide data set and is focused on appraisals, one of the most important pieces of information to the mortgage process.

The HPPI and HVI are released on the second Tuesday of every month. Both of the reports are created with Quicken Loans’ propriety mortgage data from the 50-state lenders’ mortgage activity across all 3,000+ counties. The indexes are examined nationally, in four geographic regions and the HPPI is reported for 27 major metropolitan areas. All indexes, along with downloadable tables and graphs can be found at QuickenLoans.com/Indexes.

About Quicken Loans

Detroit-based Quicken Loans Inc. is the nation’s second largest retail home mortgage lender. The company closed more than $220 billion of mortgage volume across all 50 states since 2013. Quicken Loans generates loan production from web centers located in Detroit, Cleveland and Scottsdale, Arizona. The company also operates a centralized loan processing facility in Detroit, as well as its San Diego-based One Reverse Mortgage unit. Quicken Loans ranked “Highest in Customer Satisfaction for Primary Mortgage Origination” in the United States by J.D. Power for the past six consecutive years, 2010 – 2015, and highest in customer satisfaction among all mortgage servicers in 2014 and 2015.

Quicken Loans was ranked No. 5 on FORTUNE magazine’s annual “100 Best Companies to Work For” list in 2016, and has been among the top-30 companies for the last 13 years. It has been recognized as one of Computerworld magazine’s ‘100 Best Places to Work in IT’ the past 12 years, ranking No. 1 in 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2007, 2006 and 2005. The company moved its headquarters to downtown Detroit in 2010, and now more than 10,000 of its 15,000 team members work in the city’s urban core. For more information about Quicken Loans, please visit QuickenLoans.com, on Twitter at @QLnews, and on Facebook at Facebook.com/QuickenLoans.