Early-Stage Mortgage Delinquencies Dip Again in November as Hurricanes’ Impact Wanes

  • Overall Mortgage Delinquency Rate Fell 0.1 Percentage Points Year Over Year
  • Foreclosure Rate Declined 0.2 Percentage Points Year Over Year
  • Transition Rates for 60-Day and 90-Day Delinquency Rose Sharply in Texas and Florida Likely Due to 2017 Hurricanes

IRVINE, CA – February 13, 2018 (BUSINESS WIRE) CoreLogic® (NYSE: CLGX), a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report which shows that, nationally, 5.1 percent of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due including those in foreclosure) in November 2017. This represents a 0.1 percentage point year-over-year decline in the overall delinquency rate compared with November 2016 when it was 5.2 percent.

CoreLogic Logo

As of November 2017, the foreclosure inventory rate, which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process, was 0.6 percent, down 0.2 percentage points from 0.8 percent in November 2016. The foreclosure inventory rate has held steady at 0.6 percent since August 2017, the lowest level since June 2007 when it was also at 0.6 percent. This past November’s foreclosure inventory rate was the lowest for the month of November in 11 years, since it was also 0.6 percent in November 2006.

Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next.

The rate for early-stage delinquencies, defined as 30-59 days past due, was 2.2 percent in November 2017, down 0.1 percentage points from 2.3 percent in October 2017 and unchanged from 2.2 percent in November 2016. The share of mortgages that were 60-89 days past due in November 2017 was 0.9 percent, unchanged from October 2017 and up from 0.7 percent in November 2016. The serious delinquency rate, reflecting loans 90 days or more past due, was 2.0 percent in November 2017, up from 1.9 percent in October 2017 and down from 2.3 percent in November 2016. Prior to November 2017, the serious delinquency rate had held steady for five consecutive months at 1.9 percent—the lowest level for any month since October 2007 when it was also 1.9 percent.

“The effects of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria appear clearly in our mortgage delinquency report,” said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. “Serious delinquency rates are up sharply in Texas and Florida compared with a year ago, while lower in all other states except Alaska. In Puerto Rico, the serious delinquency rate jumped to 6.3 percent in November, up 2.7 percentage points compared with a year before. In the Miami metropolitan area, serious delinquency was up more than one-third from one year earlier to 5.1 percent, and it more than doubled to 4.6 percent in the Houston area.”

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Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 1 percent in November 2017, down from 1.1 percent in October 2017 and unchanged from 1 percent in November 2016. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current-to-30-day transition rate was 1.2 percent and it peaked in November 2008 at 2 percent.

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“Transition rates for 60-day and 90-day delinquency, while stable across most of the country, were up sharply in many areas impacted by the 2017 hurricanes,” said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. “In many of the harder-hit regions, such as the Houston and Miami metropolitan areas, housing stock availability has taken a hit as many homes were damaged and are no longer habitable. As a result, we expect to see further upward pressure on prices and rents for habitable homes, which will continue to erode affordability.”

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For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: www.corelogic.com/blog.

Methodology

The data in this report represents foreclosure and delinquency activity reported through November 2017.

The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The delinquency, transition and foreclosure rates are measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Homes without mortgage liens are not typically subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data.

Source: CoreLogic

The data provided is for use only by the primary recipient or the primary recipient’s publication or broadcast. This data may not be re-sold, republished or licensed to any other source, including publications and sources owned by the primary recipient’s parent company without prior written permission from CoreLogic. Any CoreLogic data used for publication or broadcast, in whole or in part, must be sourced as coming from CoreLogic, a data and analytics company. For use with broadcast or web content, the citation must directly accompany first reference of the data. If the data is illustrated with maps, charts, graphs or other visual elements, the CoreLogic logo must be included on screen or website. For questions, analysis or interpretation of the data, contact Lori Guyton at lguyton@cvic.com or Bill Campbell at bill@campbelllewis.com. Data provided may not be modified without the prior written permission of CoreLogic. Do not use the data in any unlawful manner. This data is compiled from public records, contributory databases and proprietary analytics, and its accuracy is dependent upon these sources.

About CoreLogic

CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company’s combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.

CORELOGIC and the CoreLogic logo are trademarks of CoreLogic, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries.

Contacts

For CoreLogic
For real estate industry and trade media:
Bill Campbell
(212) 995-8057
bill@campbelllewis.com

or

For general news media:
Lori Guyton
(901)277-6066
lguyton@cvic.com

LendingTree Releases Monthly Mortgage Offer Report for January

LendingTree’s Chief Economist analyzes January’s mortgage offers

Charlotte, NC – Feb. 6, 2018 (PRNewswire) LendingTree®, the nation’s leading online loan marketplace, today released its monthly Mortgage Offers Report which analyzes data from actual loan terms offered to borrowers on LendingTree.com by lenders on LendingTree’s network. The purpose of the report is to empower consumers by providing additional information on how their credit profile affects their loan prospects.

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  • January’s best offers for borrowers with the best profiles had an average APR of 3.93% for conforming 30-year fixed purchase loans, up from 3.80% in December. Refinance loan offers were up 5 bps to 3.75%. Mortgage rates vary dependent upon parameters including credit score, loan-to-value, income and property type.
  • For the average borrower, purchase APRs for conforming 30-yr fixed loans offered on LendingTree’s platform were up 13 bps to 4.55%. The loan note rate hit the highest since March 2016 at 4.45% and was also up 13 bps from December. We prefer to emphasize the APR as lenders often make changes to other fees in response to changing interest rates.
  • Consumers with the highest credit scores (760+) saw offered APRs of 4.41% in January, vs 4.70% for consumers with scores of 680-719. The APR spread of 29 bps between these score ranges was 1 bps narrower than in December but still near the widest since this data series began in April 2016. The spread represents nearly $15,000 in additional costs for borrowers with lower credit scores over 30-years for the average purchase loan amount of $238,518. The additional costs are due to higher interest rates, larger fees or a combination of the two.
  • Refinance APRs for conforming 30-yr fixed loans were up 15 bps to 4.46%. The credit score bracket spread widened to 25 from 24 bps, amounting to $13,000 in extra costs over the life of the loan for lower credit score borrowers given an average refinance loan of $244,540.
  • Average proposed purchase down payments fell for the first time in 8 months to $63,411.

Purchase Mortgage Offers by Credit Score

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Refinance Mortgage Offers by Credit Score

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“Interest rates have decidedly moved up in a classic supply and demand driven change,” said Tendayi Kapfidze, LendingTree’s Chief Economist and report author. “On the supply side, the tax plan raised the projected borrowing needs of the US government, so debt issuance is expected to increase materially. On the demand side, the Fed’s balance sheet normalization is removing a large buyer from the marketplace.”

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Kapfidze added, “Further, the tax plan’s repatriation holiday reduces demand from US corporations for US treasuries. All this means that the US government has to pay more for borrowing, which raises the interest rate level in the economy, including mortgage rates. For consumers looking for a mortgage the benefits of optimizing the things you can control, your credit score and shopping multiple lenders, increase as the things you cannot control, such as those we detail above, become less favorable.”

About the Report

The LendingTree Mortgage Offers Report contains data from actual loan terms offered to borrowers on LendingTree.com by lenders. We believe it is an important addition to standard industry surveys and reports on mortgage rates. Most quoted industry rates are for a hypothetical borrower with prime credit who makes a 20% down payment. Most borrowers do not fit this profile. Our report includes the average quoted APR by credit score, together with the average down payment and other metrics described below. We stratify by credit score, so borrowers have added information on how their credit profile affects their loan prospects. The report covers conforming 30-yr fixed loans for both purchase and refinance.

  • APR: Actual APR offers to borrowers on our platform
  • Down Payment: Though analogous to the LTV, we find that borrowers identify more closely with the down payment. Academic studies have also found that the down payment is the primary concern for homebuyers and one of the main impediments to entering the homebuying market.
  • Loan Amount: The average loan amount borrowers are offered
  • LTV: Actual LTV offered to borrowers on our platform
  • Lifetime Interest Paid: This is the total cost a borrower incurs for the loan, inclusive of fees.

To view the original report, visit: https://www.lendingtree.com/home/lendingtree-mortgage-offers-report-january-2018/.

About LendingTree

LendingTree (NASDAQ: TREE) is the nation’s leading online loan marketplace, empowering consumers as they comparison-shop across a full suite of loan and credit-based offerings. LendingTree provides an online marketplace which connects consumers with multiple lenders that compete for their business, as well as an array of online tools and information to help consumers find the best loan. Since inception, LendingTree has facilitated more than 65 million loan requests. LendingTree provides free monthly credit scores through My LendingTree and access to its network of over 500 lenders offering home loans, personal loans, credit cards, student loans, business loans, home equity loans/lines of credit, auto loans and more. LendingTree, LLC is a subsidiary of LendingTree, Inc. For more information go to www.lendingtree.com, dial 800-555-TREE, like our Facebook page and/or follow us on Twitter @LendingTree.

Media Contact:

Megan Greuling
(704) 943-8208
Megan.greuling@lendingtree.com

Quicken Loans Becomes Largest Home Lender in America

The nation’s leading home lender will debut a new campaign touting its Rocket Mortgage technology in Super Bowl LII

Detroit, MI – Feb. 1, 2018 (PRNewswire) Detroit-based Quicken Loans today announced it has become the nation’s largest residential mortgage lender in the 4th quarter of 2017– surpassing close to 30,000 lenders (commercial banks, savings and loans, credit unions, mortgage bankers, mortgage brokers) across the country.

The company, founded in 1985, was originally launched as a brick-and-mortar branch operation, with locations primarily based in the Midwest.

Quicken Loans Logo

In 2000, Quicken Loans shifted its fundamental business model to an online platform. This strategy was pivotal in catapulting the lender into a 50-state, centralized, consumer-direct mortgage lender with capacity to close large volumes of mortgage loans in all 3,000 counties across America. In essence, it was the defining moment that would eventually lead to Quicken Loans becoming the leader in the FinTech lending industry.

Quicken Loans’ philosophy of an obsessive focus on team member and client satisfaction, combined with its game-changing technology, was the formula that allowed the lender to make consistent market share gains nearly each year over the past two decades. This unique model finally culminated with Quicken Loans emerging as the largest overall home lender in the United States in the 4th quarter of last year.*

“I could not be more proud of each and every one of our 17,474 team members, who each day bring incredible passion and determination to deliver our clients the best possible experience, during the single biggest financial transaction in most of their lifetimes,” said Dan Gilbert, Founder and Chairman of Quicken Loans. “Achieving the #1 market share of all mortgage lenders is an exciting accomplishment, but we are even more inspired that we reached this significant milestone, while at the same time delivering the best client experience in the nation for the last 8 consecutive years and running.”

Quicken Loans’ success can be attributed to the company’s strong culture, built on an uncompromised dedication to putting clients first. As a result, the company has earned an unprecedented 12 J.D. Power awards including an unprecedented eight consecutive years Quicken Loans was ranked #1 in client satisfaction in the country – a recognition based entirely on client feedback collected by the independent research firm.

The company’s investment of capital along with its culture of encouraging team member innovation has created a steady stream of disruptive technologies that simplify and speed up the lending process.

In early 2016, Quicken Loans launched Rocket Mortgage, via its first ever Super Bowl commercial. Rocket Mortgage is the first completely online and fully personalized mortgage experience and was built with proprietary technology created by the national home lender. Rocket Mortgage, which gives customers the power to get approved for a mortgage in as few as 8 minutes, forever changed the lending landscape.

Quicken Loans’ Rocket Mortgage will again bring its message to more than 100 million Americans during Super Bowl LII, on February 4, 2018. Now that millions of Americans have accessed Rocket Mortgage technology, Quicken Loans will coincide this year’s Super Bowl spot by releasing an even better, and deeper, version of Rocket Mortgage with numerous additional features and further enhanced visibility.

Contrary to the historic trend, the company will not release its ad prior to its airing scheduled for the second quarter of Super Bowl LII.

In addition to its mission of leading the home financing world in both market share and client satisfaction, QL has also taken on the revitalization of downtown Detroit and the city’s neighborhoods as an additional company mission as important as its business goals.

“We view Quicken Loans as a ‘for-more-than-profit’ company. Our successes have allowed us to invest in every aspect of our hometown community, including education, housing stability and mentoring budding entrepreneurs,” said Jay Farner, Quicken Loans CEO. “By reinvesting our resources into the neighborhoods where we live, work and play, we ensure everyone has the chance to unlock their fullest potential. This approach attracts the best and brightest in today’s world to work for our company. It creates an environment that allows each and every team member to feel they are contributing to both the business and the betterment of the communities where we are located. It’s an equation that works for the advancement of both of our primary missions.”

Since 2010, Quicken Loans team members have volunteered 375,000 hours with community organizations, and the company has directly contributed nearly $130 million to numerous charities and community groups in its hometown of Detroit. Quicken Loans’ persistent, powerful voice for the future of Detroit is matched only by its actions and initiatives to continue transforming the city – from company-funded blight removal and tax foreclosure mitigation, to creating productive business and civic partnerships to funding experiential learning programs for public school students and more.

“I want to extend a heartfelt ‘thank you’ to everyone who helped us achieve this incredible milestone. While this is exciting, it is nothing more than a landmark which will motivate us to continue innovating and executing, urgently. We still have so much to achieve, both with our business and our hometowns of Detroit, Cleveland and everywhere our team members call home,” Farner added.

*4th quarter 2017 lender volumes and market share were acquired from information gathered from public company disclosures, industry publications, and other highly-credible sources known to Rock Holdings, Inc., the parent company of Quicken Loans. Calculations of closed loan volume and market share do not include closed loans purchased from other lenders who originated, handled all consumer communication and interaction, processed, closed and funded the loan. The originating lender would include that loan in its market share. Including that same loan and double counting it by also including it in the company’s market share who is purchasing the loan would be misleading and inaccurate.

About Quicken Loans

Detroit-based Quicken Loans Inc. is the nation’s largest home mortgage lender. The company closed more than $400 billion of mortgage volume across all 50 states from 2013 through 2017. Quicken Loans moved its headquarters to downtown Detroit in 2010, and now more than 17,000 team members from Quicken Loans and its Family of Companies work in the city’s urban core. The company generates loan production from web centers located in Detroit, Cleveland and Scottsdale, Arizona. The company also operates a centralized loan processing facility in Detroit, as well as its San Diego-based One Reverse Mortgage unit. Quicken Loans ranked “Highest in Customer Satisfaction for Primary Mortgage Origination” in the United States by J.D. Power for the past eight consecutive years, 2010 – 2017, and highest in customer satisfaction among all mortgage servicers the past four years, 2014 – 2017.

Quicken Loans was ranked No. 10 on FORTUNE magazine’s annual “100 Best Companies to Work For” list in 2017, and has been among the top 30 companies for the past 14 consecutive years. The company has been recognized as one of Computerworld magazine’s “100 Best Places to Work in IT” the past 13 years, ranking No. 1 for eight of the past 12 years, including 2017. The company is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Rock Holdings, Inc., the parent company of several FinTech and related businesses. Quicken Loans is also the flagship business of Dan Gilbert’s Family of Companies comprising nearly 100 affiliated businesses spanning multiple industries. For more information and company news visit QuickenLoans.com/press-room.

LendingTree Releases Monthly Mortgage Offer Report for December

LendingTree’s Chief Economist analyzes December’s mortgage offers

Charlotte, NC – Jan. 8, 2018 (PRNewswire) LendingTree®, the nation’s leading online loan marketplace, today released its monthly Mortgage Offers Report which analyzes data from actual loan terms offered to borrowers on LendingTree.com by lenders on LendingTree’s network. The purpose of the report is to empower consumers by providing additional information on how their credit profile affects their loan prospects.

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  • December’s best offers for borrowers with the best profiles had an average APR of 3.80% for conforming 30-year fixed purchase loans, up from 3.75% in November. Refinance loan offers were up 1 bps to 3.70%. Mortgage rates vary dependent upon parameters including credit score, loan-to-value, income and property type.
  • For the average borrower, purchase APRs for conforming 30-yr fixed loans offered on LendingTree’s platform were up 12 bps to 4.42%, the highest since July 2016. The loan note rate hit the highest since March 2016 at 4.32% and was up 14 bps from November. We prefer to emphasize the APR as lenders often make changes to other fees in response to changing interest rates.
  • Consumers with the highest credit scores (760+) saw offered APRs of 4.26% in December, vs 4.56% for consumers with scores of 680-719. The APR spread of 30 bps between these score ranges was 3 bps wider than in November and the widest since this data series began in April 2016. The spread represents nearly $15,000 in additional costs for borrowers with lower credit scores over 30-years for the average purchase loan amount of $233,586. The additional costs are due to higher interest rates, larger fees or a combination of the two.
  • Refinance APRs for conforming 30-yr fixed loans were up 7 bps to 4.31%. The credit score bracket spread widened to 24 from 20 bps, amounting to $12,000 in extra costs over the life of the loan for lower credit score borrowers given an average refinance loan of $241,973.
  • Average proposed purchase down payments have been rising for 8 months and reached $63,740.

“Interest rates for 2017 were on average lower than had been expected at the start of the year but they did end the year on an upswing,” said Tendayi Kapfidze, LendingTree’s Chief Economist and report author. “Our report shows that the benefits of improving your credit score are even greater when interest rates are rising, as lenders often pass on higher costs to borrowers with poorer credit first.”

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Kapfidze added, “As a borrower, there is nothing you can do about the general level of interest rates in the economy. Since we began tracking this data in April 2016, the rate for the average borrower has risen by 50 bps from 3.92% to 4.42%. However, borrowers with 760+ credit scores saw an increase of just 40 bps, while those from 620 to 639 had their rates increase by 80 bps, twice as much. If you are considering purchasing a home this year, or refinancing, take some action to shore up your credit score and improve the rates lenders will offer you. It’s also important to comparison shop for lenders that are offering more competitive rates to borrowers.”

About the Report

The LendingTree Mortgage Offers Report contains data from actual loan terms offered to borrowers on LendingTree.com by lenders. We believe it is an important addition to standard industry surveys and reports on mortgage rates. Most quoted industry rates are for a hypothetical borrower with prime credit who makes a 20% down payment. Most borrowers do not fit this profile. Our report includes the average quoted APR by credit score, together with the average down payment and other metrics described below. We stratify by credit score, so borrowers have added information on how their credit profile affects their loan prospects. The report covers conforming 30-yr fixed loans for both purchase and refinance.

  • APR: Actual APR offers to borrowers on our platform
  • Down Payment: Though analogous to the LTV, we find that borrowers identify more closely with the down payment. Academic studies have also found that the down payment is the primary concern for homebuyers and one of the main impediments to entering the homebuying market.
  • Loan Amount: The average loan amount borrowers are offered
  • LTV: Actual LTV offered to borrowers on our platform
  • Lifetime Interest Paid: This is the total cost a borrower incurs for the loan, inclusive of fees.

To view the original report, visit: https://www.lendingtree.com/home/lendingtree-mortgage-offers-report-december-2017/.

About LendingTree

LendingTree (NASDAQ: TREE) is the nation’s leading online loan marketplace, empowering consumers as they comparison-shop across a full suite of loan and credit-based offerings. LendingTree provides an online marketplace which connects consumers with multiple lenders that compete for their business, as well as an array of online tools and information to help consumers find the best loan. Since inception, LendingTree has facilitated more than 65 million loan requests. LendingTree provides free monthly credit scores through My LendingTree and access to its network of over 500 lenders offering home loans, personal loans, credit cards, student loans, business loans, home equity loans/lines of credit, auto loans and more. LendingTree, LLC is a subsidiary of LendingTree, Inc. For more information go to www.lendingtree.com, dial 800-555-TREE, like our Facebook page and/or follow us on Twitter @LendingTree.

Media Contact:

Megan Greuling
(704) 943-8208
Megan.greuling@lendingtree.com

CoreLogic Analysis Shows Mortgage Credit Risk Increased from Q3 2016 to Q3 2017

– Credit Risk for New Loans in 2017 Similar to Loans Issued in Early 2000s—
– Mortgage Loans Exhibit Higher Credit Quality Since the Great Recession
– Purchase-Loan Risk Up Year Over Year Due to High Investor Share
– Refinance-Loan Risk Up Year Over Year Due to Lower Credit Scores and Higher DTI

Irvine, CA – December 19, 2017 (BUSINESS WIRE) CoreLogic® (NYSE: CLGX), a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its Q3 2017 CoreLogic Housing Credit Index (HCI™) which measures trends in six home mortgage credit risk attributes. The HCI indicates the relative increase or decrease in credit risk for new home loan originations compared to prior periods. The six attributes include borrower credit score, debt-to-income ratio (DTI), loan-to-value ratio (LTV), investor-owned status, condo/co-op share and documentation level.

CoreLogic Logo

In Q3 2017, the HCI increased to 111.1, up 18 points from 93.1 in Q3 2016. Even with this increase, credit risk in Q3 2017 is still within the benchmark range of the HCI. The benchmark range of 90 to 121 is measured as within one standard deviation of the average HCI value for 2001-2003, considered to be the normal baseline for credit risk. The increase in the credit risk, as measured by the HCI during the past year, was partly due to a shift in the purchase-loan mix to more investor loans and to a shift in the refinance-loan mix to borrowers with lower credit scores and higher DTI. This trend for refinance loans may reflect the rise in the FHA-to-conventional share of refinance activity.

“The CoreLogic Housing Credit Index is up compared to a year ago, in part reflecting a shift in the mix of loans to the purchase market, which typically exhibit higher risk,” said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. “Further, the Index shows higher risk attributes for both purchase and refinance loans, although the risk levels still remain similar to the early 2000s. When looking at the two most recent quarters in which the mix of purchase and refinance loans were similar, the CoreLogic Housing Credit Index for each segment remained stable. Looking forward to 2018, with continuing economic and home price growth, we expect credit-risk metrics to rise modestly.”

HCI highlights for the six Index attributes for Q3 2017:

1. Credit Score: The average credit score for homebuyers increased 7 points year over year between Q3 2016 and Q3 2017, rising from 739 to 746. In Q3 2017, the share of homebuyers with credit scores under 640 was 2 percent compared with 25 percent in 2001. In other words, the Q3 2017 share was less than one-tenth of the share in 2001.

2. Debt-to-Income: The average DTI for homebuyers in Q3 2017 was unchanged from Q3 2016 at 36. In Q3 2017, the share of homebuyers with DTIs greater than or equal to 43 percent was 22 percent, down slightly from 24 percent in Q3 2016, but up from 18 percent in 2001.

3. Loan-to-Value: The LTV for homebuyers dropped by almost 2 percentage points year over year, down from 86.4 percent in Q3 2016 to 84.9 percent in Q3 2017. In Q3 2017, the share of homebuyers with an LTV greater than or equal to 95 percent had increased by almost one-third compared with 2001.

4. Investor Share: The investor share of home-purchase loans increased slightly from 4 percent in Q3 2016 to 4.4 percent in Q3 2017.

5. Condo/Co-op Share: The share of home-purchase loans secured by a condominium or co-op building increased from 10 percent in Q3 2016 to 11.5 percent in Q3 2017.

6. Documentation Type: Low- or no-documentation loans remained a small part of the mortgage market in Q3 2017, increasing from 1.5 percent to 2.2 percent of home-purchase loans during the past year.

For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: http://www.corelogic.com/blog.

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Methodology

The CoreLogic Housing Credit Index (HCI) measures the variation in mortgage credit risk attributes and uses loan attributes from mortgage loan servicing data that are combined in a principal component analysis (PCA) model. PCA can be used to reduce a complex data set (e.g., mortgage loan characteristics) to a lower dimension to reveal properties that underlie the data set.

The HCI combines six mortgage credit risk attributes, including borrower credit score, loan-to-value (LTV) ratio, debt-to-income (DTI) ratio, documentation level (full documentation of a borrower’s economic conditions or incomplete levels of documentation, including no documentation), status of investor-owned (whether property is a non-owner-occupied investment or owner-occupied primary residence and second home) and property type (whether property is a condominium or co-op). It spans more than 15 years and covers all loan products in both the prime and subprime lending segments and includes all 50 states and the District of Columbia, permitting peak-to-peak and trough-to-trough business cycle comparisons across the U.S. The CoreLogic Loan-Level Market Analytics data includes loan-level information, both current and historical, from servicers on active first-lien mortgages in the U.S., and the Non-Agency Residential Mortgage Backed Securities (RMBS) data includes loan-level information from the securitizers. In addition, CoreLogic public records data for the origination share by loan type (conventional conforming, government, jumbo) were used to adjust the combined servicing and securities data to assure that it reflects primary market shares. These changes across different dimensions are reflected in the HCI. A rising HCI indicates increasing credit risk, while a declining HCI indicates decreasing credit risk.

Source: CoreLogic

The data provided are for use only by the primary recipient or the primary recipient’s publication or broadcast. These data may not be re-sold, republished or licensed to any other source, including publications and sources owned by the primary recipient’s parent company without prior written permission from CoreLogic. Any CoreLogic data used for publication or broadcast, in whole or in part, must be sourced as coming from CoreLogic, a data and analytics company. For use with broadcast or web content, the citation must directly accompany first reference of the data. If the data are illustrated with maps, charts, graphs or other visual elements, the CoreLogic logo must be included on screen or web site. For questions, analysis or interpretation of the data contact Lori Guyton at lguyton@cvic.com or Bill Campbell at bill@campbelllewis.com. Data provided may not be modified without the prior written permission of CoreLogic. Do not use the data in any unlawful manner. These data are compiled from public records, contributory databases and proprietary analytics, and its accuracy depends upon these sources.

About CoreLogic

CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company’s combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.

CORELOGIC, CoreLogic Housing Credit Index (HCI), and the CoreLogic logo are trademarks of CoreLogic, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries.

Contacts

For real estate industry and trade media:
Bill Campbell
(212) 995-8057
bill@campbelllewis.com

or

For general news media:
Lori Guyton
(901) 277-6066
lguyton@cvic.com

CoreLogic Reports Mortgage Delinquency Rates Lowest in More Than a Decade

  • Overall Mortgage Delinquency Rate Fell 0.2 Percentage Points Year Over Year
  • Foreclosure Rate Declined 0.2 Percentage Points Year Over Year
  • Early-Stage Delinquencies Rose 0.3 Percentage Points Year Over Year

Irvine, CA – December 12, 2017 (BUSINESS WIRE) CoreLogic® (NYSE: CLGX), a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report which shows that, nationally, 5 percent of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due including those in foreclosure) in September 2017. This represents a 0.2 percentage point year-over-year decline in the overall delinquency rate compared with September 2016 when it was 5.2 percent.

CoreLogic Logo

As of September 2017, the foreclosure inventory rate, which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process, was 0.6 percent, down from 0.8 percent in September 2016. Both August and September of this year experienced the lowest foreclosure inventory rate since June 2007 when it was also 0.6 percent, and the September foreclosure inventory rate was the lowest for the month of September in 11 years when it was 0.5 percent in September 2006.

Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next.

The rate for early-stage delinquencies, defined as 30-59 days past due, was 2.4 percent in September 2017, up 0.3 percentage points from 2.1 percent in September 2016. The share of mortgages that were 60-89 days past due in September 2017 was 0.7 percent, unchanged from September 2016. The serious delinquency rate, those that are 90 days or more past due, declined 0.4 percentage points year over year from 2.3 percent in September 2016 to 1.9 percent in September 2017. The 1.9 percent serious delinquency rate in June, July, August and September of this year marks the lowest level for any month since October 2007 when it was also 1.9 percent, and is also the lowest for the month of September since 2007 when the serious delinquency rate was 1.8 percent.

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“September’s early-stage delinquency rate increased by 0.3 percent from a year ago, the largest increase since June 2009. This does not reflect a deterioration in credit, but rather the impact of the hurricanes in Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico,” said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. “September’s early-stage delinquency transition rate rose to 2.6 percent in Texas and it rose to 3.2 percent in Florida, which is higher than the 1 percent that’s typical for both states. Texas and Florida’s early-stage delinquency transition rates in September are much lower than New Orleans in September 2005 when the transition rate reached 17.4 percent as a result of Hurricane Katrina.”

Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 1.3 percent in September 2017, up from 0.9 percent in September 2016. The September rate was the highest for any month in nearly three years, since November 2014 when it was 1.4 percent. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current-to-30-day transition rate was 1.2 percent and it peaked in November 2008 at 2 percent.

“While natural hazard risk was elevated in 2017, the economic fundamentals that drive mortgage credit performance are the best in two decades,” said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. “The combination of strong job growth, low unemployment rates, steady economic performance and prudent underwriting has led to continued improvement in mortgage performance heading into next year.”

For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: www.corelogic.com/blog.

Methodology

The data in this report represents foreclosure and delinquency activity reported through September 2017.

The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The delinquency, transition and foreclosure rates are measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Homes without mortgage liens are not typically subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data.

Source: CoreLogic

The data provided is for use only by the primary recipient or the primary recipient’s publication or broadcast. This data may not be re-sold, republished or licensed to any other source, including publications and sources owned by the primary recipient’s parent company without prior written permission from CoreLogic. Any CoreLogic data used for publication or broadcast, in whole or in part, must be sourced as coming from CoreLogic, a data and analytics company. For use with broadcast or web content, the citation must directly accompany first reference of the data. If the data is illustrated with maps, charts, graphs or other visual elements, the CoreLogic logo must be included on screen or website. For questions, analysis or interpretation of the data, contact Lori Guyton at lguyton@cvic.com or Bill Campbell at bill@campbelllewis.com. Data provided may not be modified without the prior written permission of CoreLogic. Do not use the data in any unlawful manner. This data is compiled from public records, contributory databases and proprietary analytics, and its accuracy is dependent upon these sources.

About CoreLogic

CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company’s combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.

CORELOGIC and the CoreLogic logo are trademarks of CoreLogic, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries.

Contacts

CoreLogic

For real estate industry and trade media:

Bill Campbell
(212) 995-8057
bill@campbelllewis.com

or

For general news media:

Lori Guyton
(901) 277-6066
lguyton@cvic.com